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What Do Ordinary Afghans Want from Talks?

Residents in various villages of Kabul have expressed hope that with the start of the intra-Afghan talks peace and security will be maintained in their villages. They said that villagers are less secure today than ever before.

“Everyone is being killed in this country, we hope that the meeting (Doha talks) gives a result,” said Abdul Akbar Shafaq, a villager in Farza district of Kabul.

“We need school, we need a doctor and we need a hospital,” said Abdul Zahir Zahid, a villager in Farza.

Villagers also express hope that the Taliban will change their mindset.

“War, explosions and suicide do not bring anything. If the Taliban want peace, first they should announce a ceasefire,” said Azizullah, a tribal elder in Farza.

“We want them to work for a sustainable peace, the two sides should show flexibility,” said Mohammad Rafi, a villager.

Some women in the area said that women’s voices must be heard in the peace talks.

“Our voice should be heard in the peace process with the Taliban, we should not remain behind. Women need to be in peace process,” said Wasima Haidari, the head of the Women Council's of Farza.

“There is no reason for us to fight each other, those who fought in the past are now regretful,” said Baba Jan, a resident of Bamiyan.

“The youth want peace to prevail across the country,” said an Afghan youth in Kabul.

“The Taliban should reach an agreement. Four decades of war have caused massive damages to Afghanistan,” said Amanuddin Andishmand, a resident of Kabul.

“We are optimistic about the talks, we hope that the Taliban and the government reach a consensus, people need peace now,” said Hanif Safari, a dentist in Kabul.

“They are Muslims, we are also Muslims, we are all Afghans, why we should fight each other,” said Ahmadzia Hashemi, a resident in Kabul.

“We want peace, but under special conditions, for instance, the gains which were made by the women must be protected,” said Marina Mansouri, an Afghan female professor in Kabul.

“We need to live like sisters and brothers, we should join hands and work for peace and live like other nations,” said Sanam Aslamyar, a university student in Kabul.

Meanwhile, in the center of Kabul, an Afghan female activist organized a photo exhibition of 400 civilians who were killed during attacks by the Taliban in various parts of the country.

“We can reach for peace if first we implement justice. If there is no justice, there is no peace,” said Wida Ahmadi, the photo exhibit organizer in Kabul.

What Do Ordinary Afghans Want from Talks?

“The youth want peace to prevail across the country,” said an Afghan youth in Kabul.

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Residents in various villages of Kabul have expressed hope that with the start of the intra-Afghan talks peace and security will be maintained in their villages. They said that villagers are less secure today than ever before.

“Everyone is being killed in this country, we hope that the meeting (Doha talks) gives a result,” said Abdul Akbar Shafaq, a villager in Farza district of Kabul.

“We need school, we need a doctor and we need a hospital,” said Abdul Zahir Zahid, a villager in Farza.

Villagers also express hope that the Taliban will change their mindset.

“War, explosions and suicide do not bring anything. If the Taliban want peace, first they should announce a ceasefire,” said Azizullah, a tribal elder in Farza.

“We want them to work for a sustainable peace, the two sides should show flexibility,” said Mohammad Rafi, a villager.

Some women in the area said that women’s voices must be heard in the peace talks.

“Our voice should be heard in the peace process with the Taliban, we should not remain behind. Women need to be in peace process,” said Wasima Haidari, the head of the Women Council's of Farza.

“There is no reason for us to fight each other, those who fought in the past are now regretful,” said Baba Jan, a resident of Bamiyan.

“The youth want peace to prevail across the country,” said an Afghan youth in Kabul.

“The Taliban should reach an agreement. Four decades of war have caused massive damages to Afghanistan,” said Amanuddin Andishmand, a resident of Kabul.

“We are optimistic about the talks, we hope that the Taliban and the government reach a consensus, people need peace now,” said Hanif Safari, a dentist in Kabul.

“They are Muslims, we are also Muslims, we are all Afghans, why we should fight each other,” said Ahmadzia Hashemi, a resident in Kabul.

“We want peace, but under special conditions, for instance, the gains which were made by the women must be protected,” said Marina Mansouri, an Afghan female professor in Kabul.

“We need to live like sisters and brothers, we should join hands and work for peace and live like other nations,” said Sanam Aslamyar, a university student in Kabul.

Meanwhile, in the center of Kabul, an Afghan female activist organized a photo exhibition of 400 civilians who were killed during attacks by the Taliban in various parts of the country.

“We can reach for peace if first we implement justice. If there is no justice, there is no peace,” said Wida Ahmadi, the photo exhibit organizer in Kabul.

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