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Doha Talks Will be Difficult, Tough Decisions Needed: Abdullah

Abdullah Abdullah, Chairman of the High Council for National Reconciliation, on Thursday said that the talks between the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban will be difficult, stating that the Afghan team will face issues that will require hard decisions to be made.
 
But Abdullah pledged that the rights of the Afghan people, including women’s rights and civil liberties, will be protected in the negotiations.
 
“I don’t say that these talks will be very simple, these talks will be very hard. We will face issues that will need hard decisions to be made. But the delegation of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan has gone to Qatar with the support of the Afghan government and the Afghan politicians,” said Abdullah.
 
Afghan politicians believe that recommendations for a ceasefire by the Kabul team and the recommendation by the Taliban to change the political system will obstruct the way toward reaching an agreement.
 
“The Afghan government will certainly offer a ceasefire proposal, and the Taliban are likely to propose an interim government; these are the first issues that could push the talks into a deadlock,” said Mohammad Ismail, a former mujahideen leader.
 
On the other hand, acting Foreign Minister Mohammad Haneef Atmar says that Kabul considers reaching a ceasefire a "key step" in the negotiations between Afghans.
 
“To achieve a lasting peace, we consider the ceasefire a fundamental step, and peace can be secure when it guarantees the preservation of the country's independence and territorial integrity,” said Atmar.

If not a ceasefire, a reduction in violence will be needed to establish trust between sides, say other political figures.
 
“In any dispute, securing a ceasefire is very important for building trust, and the continuation of the war and disputes will lead to complexities between the two sides,” said Abdul Raouf Anami, a parliament member.
 
However, Abdullah Abdullah, Chairman of the High Council for National Reconciliation, pledged that the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan that all the achievements of the last twenty years will be preserved during the negotiations.
 
“Citizens' rights, women's rights, human rights, victims' and minorities' rights, justice and freedoms that were achieved through many sacrifices, will be preserved in these talks,” Abdullah said.
 
For the fifth day in a row, delegations from both sides in Qatar are consulting to finalize the procedural structure of the negotiations.
 

Doha Talks Will be Difficult, Tough Decisions Needed: Abdullah

For the fifth day in a row, delegations from both sides in Qatar are consulting to finalize the procedural structure of the negotiations.

تصویر بندانگشتی

Abdullah Abdullah, Chairman of the High Council for National Reconciliation, on Thursday said that the talks between the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban will be difficult, stating that the Afghan team will face issues that will require hard decisions to be made.
 
But Abdullah pledged that the rights of the Afghan people, including women’s rights and civil liberties, will be protected in the negotiations.
 
“I don’t say that these talks will be very simple, these talks will be very hard. We will face issues that will need hard decisions to be made. But the delegation of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan has gone to Qatar with the support of the Afghan government and the Afghan politicians,” said Abdullah.
 
Afghan politicians believe that recommendations for a ceasefire by the Kabul team and the recommendation by the Taliban to change the political system will obstruct the way toward reaching an agreement.
 
“The Afghan government will certainly offer a ceasefire proposal, and the Taliban are likely to propose an interim government; these are the first issues that could push the talks into a deadlock,” said Mohammad Ismail, a former mujahideen leader.
 
On the other hand, acting Foreign Minister Mohammad Haneef Atmar says that Kabul considers reaching a ceasefire a "key step" in the negotiations between Afghans.
 
“To achieve a lasting peace, we consider the ceasefire a fundamental step, and peace can be secure when it guarantees the preservation of the country's independence and territorial integrity,” said Atmar.

If not a ceasefire, a reduction in violence will be needed to establish trust between sides, say other political figures.
 
“In any dispute, securing a ceasefire is very important for building trust, and the continuation of the war and disputes will lead to complexities between the two sides,” said Abdul Raouf Anami, a parliament member.
 
However, Abdullah Abdullah, Chairman of the High Council for National Reconciliation, pledged that the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan that all the achievements of the last twenty years will be preserved during the negotiations.
 
“Citizens' rights, women's rights, human rights, victims' and minorities' rights, justice and freedoms that were achieved through many sacrifices, will be preserved in these talks,” Abdullah said.
 
For the fifth day in a row, delegations from both sides in Qatar are consulting to finalize the procedural structure of the negotiations.
 

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