Latest news
تصویر بندانگشتی

'Taliban Shows No Flexibility in Peace': Deputy Minister

The deputy minister of justice, Zakia Adili, at an event on Wednesday called the Taliban a “monopolist” group that does not show flexibility in the peace process, and that the view of the group toward justice for victims of violence is political rather than rights-based.

Adili, who has been a member of a contact group of Afghanistan’s Islamic Republic that held talks with the Taliban, said achieving peace with the Taliban is a difficult task. 

“The Taliban is tough, they make excuses and are inflexible; or, I can say they are flexible but it is very difficult… The narrative that the Taliban has about justice is a political narrative,” Adili said at an event attended by women. 

The event was held to determine the place of judicial institutions in the peace process, and Sima Samar, the state minister for human rights affairs, said war victims should not be ignored in the talks. 

“A life without fear is not possible in the absence of justice. Ensuring justice and access to justice are the rights of humans,” Samar said. 

The Attorney General Farid Hamidi said that lasting peace cannot be ensured if citizens do not have access to independent judicial institutions. 

“We have many lessons and experiences in which setting priorities from outside Afghanistan has led us to deadlock and has wasted capital, money, energy and time,” said Hamidi. 

The remarks come as negotiating teams from Afghanistan and the Taliban have held seven meetings between contact groups over the last three weeks to discuss procedural rules for the talks. However, the two sides have not been able to come to an agreement on two of over 20 articles.  

'Taliban Shows No Flexibility in Peace': Deputy Minister

The deputy minister of justice, Zakia Adili, says achieving peace with the Taliban is a difficult task.

تصویر بندانگشتی

The deputy minister of justice, Zakia Adili, at an event on Wednesday called the Taliban a “monopolist” group that does not show flexibility in the peace process, and that the view of the group toward justice for victims of violence is political rather than rights-based.

Adili, who has been a member of a contact group of Afghanistan’s Islamic Republic that held talks with the Taliban, said achieving peace with the Taliban is a difficult task. 

“The Taliban is tough, they make excuses and are inflexible; or, I can say they are flexible but it is very difficult… The narrative that the Taliban has about justice is a political narrative,” Adili said at an event attended by women. 

The event was held to determine the place of judicial institutions in the peace process, and Sima Samar, the state minister for human rights affairs, said war victims should not be ignored in the talks. 

“A life without fear is not possible in the absence of justice. Ensuring justice and access to justice are the rights of humans,” Samar said. 

The Attorney General Farid Hamidi said that lasting peace cannot be ensured if citizens do not have access to independent judicial institutions. 

“We have many lessons and experiences in which setting priorities from outside Afghanistan has led us to deadlock and has wasted capital, money, energy and time,” said Hamidi. 

The remarks come as negotiating teams from Afghanistan and the Taliban have held seven meetings between contact groups over the last three weeks to discuss procedural rules for the talks. However, the two sides have not been able to come to an agreement on two of over 20 articles.  

Share this post