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Taliban: Doha Agreement Key to Afghanistan’s Conflict

The Taliban’s spokesman Mohammad Naeem in series of tweets on Wednesday said that the US-Taliban agreement provides a good plan to settle the conflict in Afghanistan, adding that the "Taliban are firmly committed to the agreement and expect the opponent side to demonstrate the same spirit."

“Continuation of diplomacy provides a good path to settle down the disputes,” he said.

“We consider ourselves committed to all agreements and expect the opponent side to demonstrate the same spirit,” said the Taliban spokesman.

This comes a day after the negotiating team of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan left Kabul for Doha to resume the second round of peace negotiations, which are expected to focus on ceasefire and a reduction in violence in the country.

"The leadership committee of the High Council for National Reconciliation on Monday evening met with the Afghan Republic negotiators and discussed the latest developments in the peace process and provided the team clear guidelines for the next round of talks,” Abdullah Abdullah, head of the reconciliation council said. 

Abdullah said the Republic’s team has the full support of the nation and has the mandate to discuss the peace agenda. 

“We are committed to achieving a lasting peace, and we ask the Taliban to do their part. We are looking for a successful second round,” he added. 

NATO in a tweet on Tuesday said they wish the Peace Negotiating Team of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan the very best for the second round of negotiations in Doha.  

NATO said it supports a political settlement that preserves the gains made since 2001 for the benefit of all Afghans.

US special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad on Monday said he "returns to Doha and the region with expectations that the parties will make tangible progress in the next round of Afghanistan peace negotiations" that are expected to resume Tuesday.

"Both sides must demonstrate they are acting in the best interest of the Afghan people by making real compromises and negotiating an agreement on a political settlement as soon as possible and an immediate significant reduction in violence/ceasefire," Khalilzad said.

"The current levels of violence, including targeted killings, is unacceptable. Those perpetuating the violence seek to undermine the peace process and the country's future. They do not reflect the will of the Afghan people, who yearn for peace," Khalilzad concluded.

The deputy head of the EU delegation in Afghanistan, Arnout Pauwels, said that this round of talks is critical and that the European Union expects that violence will end in the country with the start of negotiations.

“They’re absolutely crucial, the peace talks, the intra-Afghan negotiations, that should lead to inclusive and sustainable peace deal,” he said. “This country has known violence and war for a long time in its history but now forty-two years almost continuously, so almost two generations grew up with violence.”

The negotiating team said that the end of violence is a priority for them in the talks with the Taliban.

Taliban: Doha Agreement Key to Afghanistan’s Conflict

“We consider ourselves committed to all agreements and expect the opponent side to demonstrate the same spirit,” said the Taliban spokesman.

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The Taliban’s spokesman Mohammad Naeem in series of tweets on Wednesday said that the US-Taliban agreement provides a good plan to settle the conflict in Afghanistan, adding that the "Taliban are firmly committed to the agreement and expect the opponent side to demonstrate the same spirit."

“Continuation of diplomacy provides a good path to settle down the disputes,” he said.

“We consider ourselves committed to all agreements and expect the opponent side to demonstrate the same spirit,” said the Taliban spokesman.

This comes a day after the negotiating team of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan left Kabul for Doha to resume the second round of peace negotiations, which are expected to focus on ceasefire and a reduction in violence in the country.

"The leadership committee of the High Council for National Reconciliation on Monday evening met with the Afghan Republic negotiators and discussed the latest developments in the peace process and provided the team clear guidelines for the next round of talks,” Abdullah Abdullah, head of the reconciliation council said. 

Abdullah said the Republic’s team has the full support of the nation and has the mandate to discuss the peace agenda. 

“We are committed to achieving a lasting peace, and we ask the Taliban to do their part. We are looking for a successful second round,” he added. 

NATO in a tweet on Tuesday said they wish the Peace Negotiating Team of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan the very best for the second round of negotiations in Doha.  

NATO said it supports a political settlement that preserves the gains made since 2001 for the benefit of all Afghans.

US special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad on Monday said he "returns to Doha and the region with expectations that the parties will make tangible progress in the next round of Afghanistan peace negotiations" that are expected to resume Tuesday.

"Both sides must demonstrate they are acting in the best interest of the Afghan people by making real compromises and negotiating an agreement on a political settlement as soon as possible and an immediate significant reduction in violence/ceasefire," Khalilzad said.

"The current levels of violence, including targeted killings, is unacceptable. Those perpetuating the violence seek to undermine the peace process and the country's future. They do not reflect the will of the Afghan people, who yearn for peace," Khalilzad concluded.

The deputy head of the EU delegation in Afghanistan, Arnout Pauwels, said that this round of talks is critical and that the European Union expects that violence will end in the country with the start of negotiations.

“They’re absolutely crucial, the peace talks, the intra-Afghan negotiations, that should lead to inclusive and sustainable peace deal,” he said. “This country has known violence and war for a long time in its history but now forty-two years almost continuously, so almost two generations grew up with violence.”

The negotiating team said that the end of violence is a priority for them in the talks with the Taliban.

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