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'No Progress' in Negotiators’ Meetings in 3 Days

Sources from the negotiating team of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan said that agreeing on the agenda for the negotiations will take time and that neither side has shown flexibility over the last three days.

The sources said that the republic's negotiating team is insisting on ceasefire as a priority in their formal talks, but the Taliban holds that a discussion about a ceasefire must come only after an agreement on a future government. 

“There won’t be a need for ceasefire if the Islamic system is confirmed, and ceasefire will be applied accordingly,” said Sayed Akbar Agha, a former Taliban commander. 

“The parliament is following the peace process and will stand against any compromise,” said Mir Rahman Rahmani, the speaker of the parliament. 

The working groups of the two sides have held meetings over the last three days. 

“The Taliban thinks that they will not benefit if they agree to a ceasefire before an agreement on a (future) government. The Taliban does not want to agree on ceasefire ahead of an agreement,” said Gul Rahman Qazi, head of the peace and salvation council of Afghanistan. 

Meanwhile, the High Council for National Reconciliation stated that attempts to find a solution to unify the agenda are underway. 

“Discussions about unifying the agenda have started and we hope that they achieve a decision in the interest of the people of Afghanistan,” said Fraidoon Khwazoon, spokesman for the High Council for National Reconciliation. 

Peace negotiators went to Doha last week to resume the talks that were stopped for 23 days for consultation on the agenda of the negotiations.

'No Progress' in Negotiators’ Meetings in 3 Days

Sources said that the republic's negotiating team is insisting on ceasefire as a priority in their formal talks.

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Sources from the negotiating team of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan said that agreeing on the agenda for the negotiations will take time and that neither side has shown flexibility over the last three days.

The sources said that the republic's negotiating team is insisting on ceasefire as a priority in their formal talks, but the Taliban holds that a discussion about a ceasefire must come only after an agreement on a future government. 

“There won’t be a need for ceasefire if the Islamic system is confirmed, and ceasefire will be applied accordingly,” said Sayed Akbar Agha, a former Taliban commander. 

“The parliament is following the peace process and will stand against any compromise,” said Mir Rahman Rahmani, the speaker of the parliament. 

The working groups of the two sides have held meetings over the last three days. 

“The Taliban thinks that they will not benefit if they agree to a ceasefire before an agreement on a (future) government. The Taliban does not want to agree on ceasefire ahead of an agreement,” said Gul Rahman Qazi, head of the peace and salvation council of Afghanistan. 

Meanwhile, the High Council for National Reconciliation stated that attempts to find a solution to unify the agenda are underway. 

“Discussions about unifying the agenda have started and we hope that they achieve a decision in the interest of the people of Afghanistan,” said Fraidoon Khwazoon, spokesman for the High Council for National Reconciliation. 

Peace negotiators went to Doha last week to resume the talks that were stopped for 23 days for consultation on the agenda of the negotiations.

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