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No Significant Progress in Doha Talks in Past 9 Days

No significant progress has been made over the past nine days between the peace negotiators from the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban about the agenda of the talks.

Meanwhile, a member of the republic peace negotiating team has accused the Taliban of not being prepared for the talks.

The republic team has said that the reasons for the Taliban’s lack of interest in the talks are unclear.

Nevertheless, a number of Afghan politicians and Afghan citizens have decried the slow pace of the peace talks.

They said that there is a direct link between the rising violence and the slow pace of the talks.

Political leaders have warned that such a trend in the talks could jeopardize public trust in the talks.

The second round of talks between the two sides started on January 5.

“Whenever the opposition (Taliban) shows a readiness to discuss their agenda—our expectation is that the talks will get underway as soon as possible,” said Sharifa Zurmati Wardak, a member of the republic’s team.

Some Afghan political leaders have said that it looks as if the peace negotiators have been isolated after the 23-day break and they are waiting for decisions to be made in Kabul, Washington and Islamabad.

“If the Taliban insisted on their own unilateral way, or if the US tried to implement something in support of its own interest, such moves would not be acceptable to the Afghan govt and the Afghan resistance and jihadi front,” said Atta Mohammad Noor, the former governor of Balkh province.

“Each day, the people are being killed, each day, the people are being displaced from their homes, how long should this prevail,” asked Mohammad Zamir, a resident in Kabul.

“Both sides are engaged in rivalries to score points, the other side also takes advantage of this process,” said Ahmad Wali Massoud, the head of the Massoud Foundation.

“After the start of the negotiations, the fighting did not reduce; instead it increased. No one is there to think about the people,” said Jaffar Ezatkhawh, a resident in Kabul. 

While the republic team accuses the Taliban of not finalizing its agenda for the talks, the Taliban so far has not made an official comment about the allegation.

No Significant Progress in Doha Talks in Past 9 Days

Political leaders have warned that such a trend in the talks could jeopardize public trust in the talks.

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No significant progress has been made over the past nine days between the peace negotiators from the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the Taliban about the agenda of the talks.

Meanwhile, a member of the republic peace negotiating team has accused the Taliban of not being prepared for the talks.

The republic team has said that the reasons for the Taliban’s lack of interest in the talks are unclear.

Nevertheless, a number of Afghan politicians and Afghan citizens have decried the slow pace of the peace talks.

They said that there is a direct link between the rising violence and the slow pace of the talks.

Political leaders have warned that such a trend in the talks could jeopardize public trust in the talks.

The second round of talks between the two sides started on January 5.

“Whenever the opposition (Taliban) shows a readiness to discuss their agenda—our expectation is that the talks will get underway as soon as possible,” said Sharifa Zurmati Wardak, a member of the republic’s team.

Some Afghan political leaders have said that it looks as if the peace negotiators have been isolated after the 23-day break and they are waiting for decisions to be made in Kabul, Washington and Islamabad.

“If the Taliban insisted on their own unilateral way, or if the US tried to implement something in support of its own interest, such moves would not be acceptable to the Afghan govt and the Afghan resistance and jihadi front,” said Atta Mohammad Noor, the former governor of Balkh province.

“Each day, the people are being killed, each day, the people are being displaced from their homes, how long should this prevail,” asked Mohammad Zamir, a resident in Kabul.

“Both sides are engaged in rivalries to score points, the other side also takes advantage of this process,” said Ahmad Wali Massoud, the head of the Massoud Foundation.

“After the start of the negotiations, the fighting did not reduce; instead it increased. No one is there to think about the people,” said Jaffar Ezatkhawh, a resident in Kabul. 

While the republic team accuses the Taliban of not finalizing its agenda for the talks, the Taliban so far has not made an official comment about the allegation.

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