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تصویر بندانگشتی

Father Who Lost 3 Sons in War Calls for Peace

Ghulam Akbar, a native of Kunar, on Tuesday said that his three sons who were serving in the Afghan security forces have been killed, and he called for peace.

The 65-year-old father said that all three sons were married and they left six children behind.

“I sacrificed my three sons. I am also prepared to sacrifice myself if peace comes--but a peace that could safeguard the future of our children,” said Ghulam Akbar.

He said that the widows of his sons then returned to their fathers' homes and married others due to poverty.

“We were playing in our childhood—one was becoming a thief and another one a minister and another the king, this government is the same today,” said Ghulam Akbar referring to the weak economic situation.

“The fathers of my classmates give them money at school and they buy something, but we can't buy anything because we do not have money to buy good dresses, my grandfather can't afford it,” said Nazawali, the daughter of one of the slain soldiers.

Ghulam Akbar says his sons, who were members of the army and the ANP, all died within the span of seven years in battles with insurgents in Nuristan, Sar-e-Pul and Helmand provinces.

This Kunar man hopes that one day he will hear a message about the end of the war and violence so that he will no longer worry about the future of his children.

Father Who Lost 3 Sons in War Calls for Peace

The 65-year-old father said that all three sons were married and they left six children behind.

تصویر بندانگشتی

Ghulam Akbar, a native of Kunar, on Tuesday said that his three sons who were serving in the Afghan security forces have been killed, and he called for peace.

The 65-year-old father said that all three sons were married and they left six children behind.

“I sacrificed my three sons. I am also prepared to sacrifice myself if peace comes--but a peace that could safeguard the future of our children,” said Ghulam Akbar.

He said that the widows of his sons then returned to their fathers' homes and married others due to poverty.

“We were playing in our childhood—one was becoming a thief and another one a minister and another the king, this government is the same today,” said Ghulam Akbar referring to the weak economic situation.

“The fathers of my classmates give them money at school and they buy something, but we can't buy anything because we do not have money to buy good dresses, my grandfather can't afford it,” said Nazawali, the daughter of one of the slain soldiers.

Ghulam Akbar says his sons, who were members of the army and the ANP, all died within the span of seven years in battles with insurgents in Nuristan, Sar-e-Pul and Helmand provinces.

This Kunar man hopes that one day he will hear a message about the end of the war and violence so that he will no longer worry about the future of his children.

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