Latest news
Thumbnail

US Lawmakers Seek Continued Efforts in Afghanistan

Eleven members of the US House of Representatives--10 Democrats and one Republican--wrote a letter to President Joe Biden on the “enduring interests and ideals that should continue to guide US efforts in Afghanistan even as the armed forces end their mission in the country” amid the start of the withdrawal of American troops from the country.

The letter was signed by US Reps. Tom Malinowski (D), Jim Langevin (D), Mike Waltz (R), Stephanie Murphy (D), William R. Keating (D), Chrissy Houlahan (D), Colin Allred (D), Dean Phillips (D), David Cicilline (D), Gerald E. Connolly (D) and Bill Foster (D).

The withdrawal of the US military, which began on May 1 and is scheduled to continue until Sept. 11, 2021, has raised concerns over the future of Afghanistan, especially gains achieved in women’s rights, girls' education and the growth of civil society, which includes a free media.

The lawmakers said they hope President Biden will continue to make clear that "America’s policy in Afghanistan is to ensure the survival and success of that government and of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces and to stand by those Afghans who bet their lives on the future the US promised them."

They mentioned that the capabilities of Afghanistan’s security forces will determine whether the Taliban succeeds in “reimposing medieval rule over Afghanistan’s 40 million people; whether al-Qaeda and Daesh reestablish terrorist sanctuary there; and whether the country once again unravels in civil war.”

The peace process, meanwhile, has moved forward haltingly, especially after President Biden announced the full withdrawal of US forces by Sept. 11. The Taliban has recently expressed their intentions to resume the talks, but their unwillingness to participate at a UN-led conference in Turkey has delayed the event multiple times since April.  

The lawmakers, pointing to the abilities of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces, said if there is any prospect of a just, peaceful settlement in Afghanistan, it will happen “only after the Afghan military demonstrates to the Taliban that their insurgency will not triumph on the battlefield.”

The congress members reiterated that the United States needs a strategy to sustain its Afghan military partners after the full withdrawal of American troops from the country.  

Violence has remained high in Afghanistan despite a three-day ceasefire from May 12 to May 15. A day after the ceasefire ended, security agencies reported clashes between government forces and the Taliban in 18 provinces.   

The lawmakers said that Afghans have long borne the overwhelming brunt of the counterterrorism fight in their country and that they remain heavily dependent on US and international enablers, including intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance assets and maintenance and repair for their equipment.  

Meanwhile, the lawmakers said that they will support generous US funding for Afghanistan’s civil society and for its social and economic development. But international assistance will only help if there is security for the Afghan people and proper on-the-ground oversight of that aid, they said.

They added that if security deteriorates, those Afghans most at risk may need to find safety elsewhere.

Citing the targeted killings of civil leaders and the Kabul school attack that killed over 80 female students, the representatives wrote: "We will support generous US funding for Afghanistan’s civil society and for its social and economic development. But international assistance will only help if there is security for the Afghan people and proper on-the-ground oversight of that aid. And if security deteriorates, those Afghans most at risk may need to find safety elsewhere."

The representatives wrote that the Special Immigration Visas (SIV) for translators, contractors, security personnel and others who helped US forces should be expedited, along with the US Refugee Admissions Programs "to provide the response necessary to address this issue over the next few months."

"We must move swiftly to expedite life-saving programs that provide a path to safety for those who loyally worked alongside US troops, diplomats, and contractors. To that end, we will work with you to address challenges facing the Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) and the US Refugee Admissions Programs in providing the response necessary to address this issue over the next few months," the lawmakers urged.

The letter went on to say: "Other Afghans, including women’s rights activists, civic leaders, journalists, and elected officials, would face a credible fear of persecution if the Taliban return to power," and suggested a system be developed for "in country processing of Afghans in this category" to allow for earlier vetting if it becomes necessary to process their complaints quickly in the future.  

Recently, Afghan contractors who worked with US and coalition forces in Afghanistan held two gatherings during which they expressed their concerns over their safety as well as their familiess’ safety after foreign troops leave the country.

The lawmakers said that the Taliban-US agreement will compel the contractors’ departure as well as those who provide most of the mentioned functions, including surveillance and reconnaissance.

The lawmakers also expressed their concerns about reports of Turkey considering removing their security forces that currently protect the International Hamid Karzai Airport in Kabul, but they reiterated that there is a need for continued US funding to help Afghanistan maintain critical military capabilities.

Echoing recent remarks by some American military officials, US lawmakers said that the Taliban continues its efforts to remove the Afghan government by force, suggesting that it is time to consider a tougher approach against its international backers, including potential sanctions.

This comes as US special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad on Tuesday said that the prediction that the Taliban will quickly overrun Afghan forces and conquer Kabul after full US withdrawal is unduly pessimistic.

“I personally believe that the statements that their forces will disintegrate and the Talibs will take over in short order are mistaken,” Khalilzad told the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Khalilzad said that the Afghan government and the Taliban should do their part in the peace process. He stressed the need for Pakistan’s role in the peace efforts in Afghanistan.

On May 17, President Ashraf Ghani said that the Afghan government is ready to fight against the Taliban after the full withdrawal of international troops from the country, reiterating that the key to peace talks is to accept the election as a way forward for Afghanistan’s future government.

US Lawmakers Seek Continued Efforts in Afghanistan

US lawmakers said the United States needs a strategy to sustain its Afghan military partners after full withdrawal.

Thumbnail

Eleven members of the US House of Representatives--10 Democrats and one Republican--wrote a letter to President Joe Biden on the “enduring interests and ideals that should continue to guide US efforts in Afghanistan even as the armed forces end their mission in the country” amid the start of the withdrawal of American troops from the country.

The letter was signed by US Reps. Tom Malinowski (D), Jim Langevin (D), Mike Waltz (R), Stephanie Murphy (D), William R. Keating (D), Chrissy Houlahan (D), Colin Allred (D), Dean Phillips (D), David Cicilline (D), Gerald E. Connolly (D) and Bill Foster (D).

The withdrawal of the US military, which began on May 1 and is scheduled to continue until Sept. 11, 2021, has raised concerns over the future of Afghanistan, especially gains achieved in women’s rights, girls' education and the growth of civil society, which includes a free media.

The lawmakers said they hope President Biden will continue to make clear that "America’s policy in Afghanistan is to ensure the survival and success of that government and of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces and to stand by those Afghans who bet their lives on the future the US promised them."

They mentioned that the capabilities of Afghanistan’s security forces will determine whether the Taliban succeeds in “reimposing medieval rule over Afghanistan’s 40 million people; whether al-Qaeda and Daesh reestablish terrorist sanctuary there; and whether the country once again unravels in civil war.”

The peace process, meanwhile, has moved forward haltingly, especially after President Biden announced the full withdrawal of US forces by Sept. 11. The Taliban has recently expressed their intentions to resume the talks, but their unwillingness to participate at a UN-led conference in Turkey has delayed the event multiple times since April.  

The lawmakers, pointing to the abilities of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces, said if there is any prospect of a just, peaceful settlement in Afghanistan, it will happen “only after the Afghan military demonstrates to the Taliban that their insurgency will not triumph on the battlefield.”

The congress members reiterated that the United States needs a strategy to sustain its Afghan military partners after the full withdrawal of American troops from the country.  

Violence has remained high in Afghanistan despite a three-day ceasefire from May 12 to May 15. A day after the ceasefire ended, security agencies reported clashes between government forces and the Taliban in 18 provinces.   

The lawmakers said that Afghans have long borne the overwhelming brunt of the counterterrorism fight in their country and that they remain heavily dependent on US and international enablers, including intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance assets and maintenance and repair for their equipment.  

Meanwhile, the lawmakers said that they will support generous US funding for Afghanistan’s civil society and for its social and economic development. But international assistance will only help if there is security for the Afghan people and proper on-the-ground oversight of that aid, they said.

They added that if security deteriorates, those Afghans most at risk may need to find safety elsewhere.

Citing the targeted killings of civil leaders and the Kabul school attack that killed over 80 female students, the representatives wrote: "We will support generous US funding for Afghanistan’s civil society and for its social and economic development. But international assistance will only help if there is security for the Afghan people and proper on-the-ground oversight of that aid. And if security deteriorates, those Afghans most at risk may need to find safety elsewhere."

The representatives wrote that the Special Immigration Visas (SIV) for translators, contractors, security personnel and others who helped US forces should be expedited, along with the US Refugee Admissions Programs "to provide the response necessary to address this issue over the next few months."

"We must move swiftly to expedite life-saving programs that provide a path to safety for those who loyally worked alongside US troops, diplomats, and contractors. To that end, we will work with you to address challenges facing the Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) and the US Refugee Admissions Programs in providing the response necessary to address this issue over the next few months," the lawmakers urged.

The letter went on to say: "Other Afghans, including women’s rights activists, civic leaders, journalists, and elected officials, would face a credible fear of persecution if the Taliban return to power," and suggested a system be developed for "in country processing of Afghans in this category" to allow for earlier vetting if it becomes necessary to process their complaints quickly in the future.  

Recently, Afghan contractors who worked with US and coalition forces in Afghanistan held two gatherings during which they expressed their concerns over their safety as well as their familiess’ safety after foreign troops leave the country.

The lawmakers said that the Taliban-US agreement will compel the contractors’ departure as well as those who provide most of the mentioned functions, including surveillance and reconnaissance.

The lawmakers also expressed their concerns about reports of Turkey considering removing their security forces that currently protect the International Hamid Karzai Airport in Kabul, but they reiterated that there is a need for continued US funding to help Afghanistan maintain critical military capabilities.

Echoing recent remarks by some American military officials, US lawmakers said that the Taliban continues its efforts to remove the Afghan government by force, suggesting that it is time to consider a tougher approach against its international backers, including potential sanctions.

This comes as US special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad on Tuesday said that the prediction that the Taliban will quickly overrun Afghan forces and conquer Kabul after full US withdrawal is unduly pessimistic.

“I personally believe that the statements that their forces will disintegrate and the Talibs will take over in short order are mistaken,” Khalilzad told the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

Khalilzad said that the Afghan government and the Taliban should do their part in the peace process. He stressed the need for Pakistan’s role in the peace efforts in Afghanistan.

On May 17, President Ashraf Ghani said that the Afghan government is ready to fight against the Taliban after the full withdrawal of international troops from the country, reiterating that the key to peace talks is to accept the election as a way forward for Afghanistan’s future government.

Share this post