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Clerics Again Call to Reopen Girls' Schools

Religious scholars in a conference under the name of "National Dialogue of Afghan Scholars" in Kabul once again called on the Islamic Emirate to reopen all girls' schools in the country.

At the gathering in Kabul, they said there was no legal justification for banning girls above sixth grade from going to school.

“In light of the guidance of the holy religion of Islam, find a suitable way to solve the crisis in the country, especially to provide education for girls above the sixth grade and to provide employment for women,” said Abdul Sattar Hayat, a member of the Ulema Movement of Afghanistan.

“The duty and responsibility of the Islamic system toward the sisters (girls) is to ensure their security, and the second step it is to facilitate the field of work and education for them,” said Farzana Obaidi, a teacher of a Madrasa (Religious school).

Issuing a resolution, clerics ask the Islamic Emirate to find a way for girls and women in the country to lead a normal life.

Religious scholars also said that ways must be considered to include women in society and their right to work within the framework of Islamic law.

“Women deserve to be entrepreneurs in the political affairs of a government, to be involved in the education system,” said Mawlawi Abdul Malik Ziaei, a religious scholar.

Meanwhile, a number of human rights activists who participated in the gathering also called on the Islamic Emirate.

“It has been seven months that the Islamic Emirate promised that it would provide education for girls based on Islamic values and culture, while Islamic values and rules are clear and there is no Islamic country that has prevented girls from attending school,” said Toorpakai, deputy of the Afghan Women's Institute for Peace and Freedom.

“Schools should not be closed anymore because the people cannot tolerate more oppression and there is no legal or logical justification for closing the girls' schools based on the stance of the current authorities,” said Halima Naseri, a school teacher.

The Ministry of Education said that the reopening of girls' schools above the sixth grade depends on the decision of the leadership of the Islamic Emirate, and the Ministry of Education has proposed a plan to reopen girls' schools to the Prime Minister.

Clerics Again Call to Reopen Girls' Schools

At the gathering in Kabul, they said there was no legal justification for banning girls above sixth grade from going to school.

تصویر بندانگشتی

Religious scholars in a conference under the name of "National Dialogue of Afghan Scholars" in Kabul once again called on the Islamic Emirate to reopen all girls' schools in the country.

At the gathering in Kabul, they said there was no legal justification for banning girls above sixth grade from going to school.

“In light of the guidance of the holy religion of Islam, find a suitable way to solve the crisis in the country, especially to provide education for girls above the sixth grade and to provide employment for women,” said Abdul Sattar Hayat, a member of the Ulema Movement of Afghanistan.

“The duty and responsibility of the Islamic system toward the sisters (girls) is to ensure their security, and the second step it is to facilitate the field of work and education for them,” said Farzana Obaidi, a teacher of a Madrasa (Religious school).

Issuing a resolution, clerics ask the Islamic Emirate to find a way for girls and women in the country to lead a normal life.

Religious scholars also said that ways must be considered to include women in society and their right to work within the framework of Islamic law.

“Women deserve to be entrepreneurs in the political affairs of a government, to be involved in the education system,” said Mawlawi Abdul Malik Ziaei, a religious scholar.

Meanwhile, a number of human rights activists who participated in the gathering also called on the Islamic Emirate.

“It has been seven months that the Islamic Emirate promised that it would provide education for girls based on Islamic values and culture, while Islamic values and rules are clear and there is no Islamic country that has prevented girls from attending school,” said Toorpakai, deputy of the Afghan Women's Institute for Peace and Freedom.

“Schools should not be closed anymore because the people cannot tolerate more oppression and there is no legal or logical justification for closing the girls' schools based on the stance of the current authorities,” said Halima Naseri, a school teacher.

The Ministry of Education said that the reopening of girls' schools above the sixth grade depends on the decision of the leadership of the Islamic Emirate, and the Ministry of Education has proposed a plan to reopen girls' schools to the Prime Minister.

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