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UNSC Scheduled to Vote on Women's Restrictions in Afghanistan

The UN Security Council (UNSC) is set to vote on Thursday to condemn the ban on Afghan women working for the United Nations in Afghanistan and call upon the Islamic Emirate to "swiftly reverse" its crackdown on the rights of women and girls.

The resolution to be voted on - drafted by the United Arab Emirates and Japan and seen by Reuters - describes the ban as "unprecedented in the history of the United Nations" and asserts "the indispensable role of women in Afghan society."

According to the Reuters report, the UAE ambassador to the UN, Lana Zaki Nusseibeh, said the restrictions "could jeopardize the operations of the UN in Afghanistan as a whole" and that the Security Council could not stay silent.

"The challenges in Afghanistan are multifaceted and must also be addressed," she said. "But what is clear is that without women, the dire situation in the country cannot be addressed sustainably."

The Security Council will vote days before a planned international meeting in Doha on May 1-2 on Afghanistan. UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres will convene behind closed doors special envoys on Afghanistan from various countries to work on a unified approach to dealing with the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan.

Although the Islamic Emirate has not commented on this matter, it has always said that the issue of women is an internal issue of the country.

The Islamic Emirate’s spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid asked the participants of the meeting in Doha to decide on the recognition of the Islamic Emirate.

"The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan is a system; the Afghan people demand it to be recognized, and they should be given rights in the United Nations and other nations. In any case, We want good ties with all countries,” Mujahid noted.

TASS reported that the Russian special envoy for Afghanistan, Zamir Kabulov, said that he would attend a meeting of special envoys on Afghanistan in Doha on May 1, saying that he does not have high expectations.

"We do not have any high [expectations], because what [UN chief] Guterres has been trying to do is strike a sort of balance between the approaches of countries in the region and those of the US-led collective West, which can hardly be reconciled. We’ll see. At least, we will conduct a candid conversation. And time will tell what will come of it," Kabulov told TASS.

"The Islamic Emirate can have an understanding with the international community by relying on principles and by upholding national and Islamic values," said political analyst Sayed Muqadam Amin.

"The Islamic Emirate is required to implement the laws, decrees, and resolutions of the Security Council and other institutions of this international organization,” said Najib Rahman Shamal, another political analyst.

The Associate Director of the Women's Rights Division at Human Rights Watch, Heather Barr, on Twitter, criticized the absence of women in the meeting that is to be held.

Barr tweeted: "The UN is responsible for implementing Sec Council resolution 1325, which says women must be full participants in discussions about their country’s future. Why isn’t that happening?”

UNSC Scheduled to Vote on Women's Restrictions in Afghanistan

Although the Islamic Emirate has not commented on this matter, it has always said that the issue of women is an internal issue of the country.

تصویر بندانگشتی

The UN Security Council (UNSC) is set to vote on Thursday to condemn the ban on Afghan women working for the United Nations in Afghanistan and call upon the Islamic Emirate to "swiftly reverse" its crackdown on the rights of women and girls.

The resolution to be voted on - drafted by the United Arab Emirates and Japan and seen by Reuters - describes the ban as "unprecedented in the history of the United Nations" and asserts "the indispensable role of women in Afghan society."

According to the Reuters report, the UAE ambassador to the UN, Lana Zaki Nusseibeh, said the restrictions "could jeopardize the operations of the UN in Afghanistan as a whole" and that the Security Council could not stay silent.

"The challenges in Afghanistan are multifaceted and must also be addressed," she said. "But what is clear is that without women, the dire situation in the country cannot be addressed sustainably."

The Security Council will vote days before a planned international meeting in Doha on May 1-2 on Afghanistan. UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres will convene behind closed doors special envoys on Afghanistan from various countries to work on a unified approach to dealing with the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan.

Although the Islamic Emirate has not commented on this matter, it has always said that the issue of women is an internal issue of the country.

The Islamic Emirate’s spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid asked the participants of the meeting in Doha to decide on the recognition of the Islamic Emirate.

"The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan is a system; the Afghan people demand it to be recognized, and they should be given rights in the United Nations and other nations. In any case, We want good ties with all countries,” Mujahid noted.

TASS reported that the Russian special envoy for Afghanistan, Zamir Kabulov, said that he would attend a meeting of special envoys on Afghanistan in Doha on May 1, saying that he does not have high expectations.

"We do not have any high [expectations], because what [UN chief] Guterres has been trying to do is strike a sort of balance between the approaches of countries in the region and those of the US-led collective West, which can hardly be reconciled. We’ll see. At least, we will conduct a candid conversation. And time will tell what will come of it," Kabulov told TASS.

"The Islamic Emirate can have an understanding with the international community by relying on principles and by upholding national and Islamic values," said political analyst Sayed Muqadam Amin.

"The Islamic Emirate is required to implement the laws, decrees, and resolutions of the Security Council and other institutions of this international organization,” said Najib Rahman Shamal, another political analyst.

The Associate Director of the Women's Rights Division at Human Rights Watch, Heather Barr, on Twitter, criticized the absence of women in the meeting that is to be held.

Barr tweeted: "The UN is responsible for implementing Sec Council resolution 1325, which says women must be full participants in discussions about their country’s future. Why isn’t that happening?”

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