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تصویر بندانگشتی

PM Hassan Akhund Condemns Pakistan's Treatment of Expelled Afghans

The Islamic Emirate’s Prime Minister, Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund reacted to the expulsion of Afghan refugees by Pakistan, saying that the action is against international laws.

In a video message, PM Akhund called on Pakistan to not “expel Afghans in an undignified manner, to not harass Afghans and to give them sufficient time so that they can return in a dignified manner.”

“If their [Pakistan] reason is to expel undocumented migrants only, then why are they humiliating the refugees, stealing their property, and destroying their houses?” he said.

The PM also warned Pakistan of consequences of the mistreatment of Afghan refugees and said: “You [Pakistan] are a neighbor, you should think about the future.”

National security spokesperson John Kirby told a press conference that Washington wants to see all nations do “what they can to help refugees and asylum seekers.”

The UN Secretary General’s Spokesman, Stéphane Dujarric, said that the UN is appealing to Pakistan to continue its protection of all “vulnerable” Afghans who sought safety in the country.

Pakistan announced in early October it would expel 1.73 million Afghan refugees whom it considered “illegal” after November 1 this year.

The decision faced international criticism with many human rights organizations calling on Islamabad to reverse the planned action.

Many Afghans complained of mistreatment by Pakistani police while being deported.

“Around 50 people were going in this truck. It has been hired by 6 families for Rs. 2, 20, 000. We had no time to bargain because the CDA was pushing us,” said Khial Gul, an Afghan refugee, who was quoted by Reuters. “They destroyed our houses yesterday. So we had to hire a vehicle hurriedly today. Now we are going to Afghanistan. Everyone will try to find some work there."

“These people are being very cruel to us. If they had given us 4 or 5 months more, we could have spent the winter here in comfort,” said Abdul Rahim Mahajar, an Afghan refugee. 

“Then, God willing, we would have gone back to our country," an Afghan refugee said.

PM Hassan Akhund Condemns Pakistan's Treatment of Expelled Afghans

Pakistan announced in early October it would expel 1.73 million Afghan refugees whom it considered “illegal” after November 1 this year.

تصویر بندانگشتی

The Islamic Emirate’s Prime Minister, Mullah Mohammad Hassan Akhund reacted to the expulsion of Afghan refugees by Pakistan, saying that the action is against international laws.

In a video message, PM Akhund called on Pakistan to not “expel Afghans in an undignified manner, to not harass Afghans and to give them sufficient time so that they can return in a dignified manner.”

“If their [Pakistan] reason is to expel undocumented migrants only, then why are they humiliating the refugees, stealing their property, and destroying their houses?” he said.

The PM also warned Pakistan of consequences of the mistreatment of Afghan refugees and said: “You [Pakistan] are a neighbor, you should think about the future.”

National security spokesperson John Kirby told a press conference that Washington wants to see all nations do “what they can to help refugees and asylum seekers.”

The UN Secretary General’s Spokesman, Stéphane Dujarric, said that the UN is appealing to Pakistan to continue its protection of all “vulnerable” Afghans who sought safety in the country.

Pakistan announced in early October it would expel 1.73 million Afghan refugees whom it considered “illegal” after November 1 this year.

The decision faced international criticism with many human rights organizations calling on Islamabad to reverse the planned action.

Many Afghans complained of mistreatment by Pakistani police while being deported.

“Around 50 people were going in this truck. It has been hired by 6 families for Rs. 2, 20, 000. We had no time to bargain because the CDA was pushing us,” said Khial Gul, an Afghan refugee, who was quoted by Reuters. “They destroyed our houses yesterday. So we had to hire a vehicle hurriedly today. Now we are going to Afghanistan. Everyone will try to find some work there."

“These people are being very cruel to us. If they had given us 4 or 5 months more, we could have spent the winter here in comfort,” said Abdul Rahim Mahajar, an Afghan refugee. 

“Then, God willing, we would have gone back to our country," an Afghan refugee said.

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