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NYT Reports on US-Backed Abductions, Killings, Torture in Afghanistan

The New York Times has claimed in its latest investigation that under the command of former Kandahar police chief Abdul Raziq, who was supported by the US, more than 300 Afghan civilians went missing. 

This report, published today (Wednesday, May 22), mentions the results of over a year of research, including interviews with hundreds of families whose sons or husbands disappeared in Kandahar and have not been seen since.

The report states that although Abdul Raziq was a top choice for the Americans in the fight against the "Taliban" in Kandahar, it criticizes Washington for empowering warlords, corrupt politicians, and criminals in Afghanistan.

The report says, "The New York Times found that he [Abdul Raziq] had turned the police into fearsome forces, and his officers killed, kidnapped, and tortured hundreds of people in secret prisons, many of whom were never seen again. Meanwhile, US presidents, generals, and ambassadors emphasized human rights for a better Afghanistan. This helps explain why America lost the war in Afghanistan."

The report mentions that Abdul Raziq's forces, despite being effective against the "Taliban," achieved this effectiveness at a clear cost, as the "Taliban" used his cruelty to recruit new members. 

Some Afghans told the New York Times, "While they did not support the Taliban, they were happy to see the U.S.-backed Afghan government fall."

Many American officials told the New York Times that in the fight against the "Taliban" in Kandahar, Abdul Raziq was America's only ally capable of defeating the "Taliban." 

Another part of the report states, "The United Nations, human rights organizations, and media had serious concerns about Abdul Raziq's forces, but at the time, independent investigations in Kandahar were not possible."

The New York Times investigators went to hundreds of homes in Kandahar and spoke with nearly a thousand people who said government forces had kidnapped their family members.

However, the investigation only included 368 cases of forced disappearances and dozens of extra-judicial killings attributed to US-backed forces in Kandahar. 

Abdul Raziq's brother, Tadin Khan, who was appointed Kandahar police chief after his brother, denied these accusations to the New York Times.

Abdul Raziq was assassinated by the "Taliban" in Kandahar in October 2018.

The New York Times reported that after the fall of the previous Afghan government, mass graves were discovered in Kandahar, but no organized investigation has been conducted yet.

NYT Reports on US-Backed Abductions, Killings, Torture in Afghanistan

Some Afghans told the New York Times, "While they did not support the Taliban, they were happy to see the U.S.-backed Afghan government fall."

تصویر بندانگشتی

The New York Times has claimed in its latest investigation that under the command of former Kandahar police chief Abdul Raziq, who was supported by the US, more than 300 Afghan civilians went missing. 

This report, published today (Wednesday, May 22), mentions the results of over a year of research, including interviews with hundreds of families whose sons or husbands disappeared in Kandahar and have not been seen since.

The report states that although Abdul Raziq was a top choice for the Americans in the fight against the "Taliban" in Kandahar, it criticizes Washington for empowering warlords, corrupt politicians, and criminals in Afghanistan.

The report says, "The New York Times found that he [Abdul Raziq] had turned the police into fearsome forces, and his officers killed, kidnapped, and tortured hundreds of people in secret prisons, many of whom were never seen again. Meanwhile, US presidents, generals, and ambassadors emphasized human rights for a better Afghanistan. This helps explain why America lost the war in Afghanistan."

The report mentions that Abdul Raziq's forces, despite being effective against the "Taliban," achieved this effectiveness at a clear cost, as the "Taliban" used his cruelty to recruit new members. 

Some Afghans told the New York Times, "While they did not support the Taliban, they were happy to see the U.S.-backed Afghan government fall."

Many American officials told the New York Times that in the fight against the "Taliban" in Kandahar, Abdul Raziq was America's only ally capable of defeating the "Taliban." 

Another part of the report states, "The United Nations, human rights organizations, and media had serious concerns about Abdul Raziq's forces, but at the time, independent investigations in Kandahar were not possible."

The New York Times investigators went to hundreds of homes in Kandahar and spoke with nearly a thousand people who said government forces had kidnapped their family members.

However, the investigation only included 368 cases of forced disappearances and dozens of extra-judicial killings attributed to US-backed forces in Kandahar. 

Abdul Raziq's brother, Tadin Khan, who was appointed Kandahar police chief after his brother, denied these accusations to the New York Times.

Abdul Raziq was assassinated by the "Taliban" in Kandahar in October 2018.

The New York Times reported that after the fall of the previous Afghan government, mass graves were discovered in Kandahar, but no organized investigation has been conducted yet.

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