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AIHRC Criticizes Fact-Finding Commissions

Officials from the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) on Wednesday strongly criticized fact-finding commissions for not sharing outcomes of their investigations with the public, saying the Afghan people have the right to know the details of current incidents.

The watchdog group cited the recent raid by the National Directorate of Security (NDS) in Kabul on the residence of Amer Abdul Sattar, a former mujahideen leader, in which Sattar and four others were killed.

“The human rights commission wants these reports to be published. We hope that the Afghan government informs the Afghan people about it,” said Zabiullah Farhang, media advisor to AIHRC.

But the Afghan government says that the fact-finding is still continuing.

“All necessary investigations were carried out, discussions were held with all sides, results of the investigations have been sent to the president so that he can study the report,” said Jawed Faisal, spokesman for the Office of National Security Advisor.

“Whenever, the leader of the Ministry of Defense assigns a delegation regarding an incident, then the incidents are investigated sincerely and comprehensively,” said Rohullah Ahmadzai, a spokesman for the Ministry of Defense.

Amer Sattar was a former mujahideen leader who was killed with four others in an operation by the NDS special unit in the north of Kabul on January 19.

The human rights commission said that the government has also failed to share the details of the killing of at least 10 civilians during an air raid in Balkh province ten days ago.

“Unfortunately the perpetrators behind the civilian casualties weren’t prosecuted to the full extent,” said Behzad Hakak, a member of AIHRC.

Meanwhile, family members of some of the victims gathered in Kabul where they demanded justice to be served and the perpetrators of civilian deaths punished.

“One of my nephews asks me about when my father will come back, but I make fake promises to him that your father will return when the war ends and peace comes,” said Noria, who has lost family members in the war.

“No religion allows the killing of women and children,” said Mohammad Sadiq, a resident in Kabul.

According to rights groups, in most cases, fact-finding commissions are politically influenced.

AIHRC Criticizes Fact-Finding Commissions

Family members of some of the victims gathered in Kabul where they demanded justice to be served and the perpetrators of civilian deaths punished.

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Officials from the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) on Wednesday strongly criticized fact-finding commissions for not sharing outcomes of their investigations with the public, saying the Afghan people have the right to know the details of current incidents.

The watchdog group cited the recent raid by the National Directorate of Security (NDS) in Kabul on the residence of Amer Abdul Sattar, a former mujahideen leader, in which Sattar and four others were killed.

“The human rights commission wants these reports to be published. We hope that the Afghan government informs the Afghan people about it,” said Zabiullah Farhang, media advisor to AIHRC.

But the Afghan government says that the fact-finding is still continuing.

“All necessary investigations were carried out, discussions were held with all sides, results of the investigations have been sent to the president so that he can study the report,” said Jawed Faisal, spokesman for the Office of National Security Advisor.

“Whenever, the leader of the Ministry of Defense assigns a delegation regarding an incident, then the incidents are investigated sincerely and comprehensively,” said Rohullah Ahmadzai, a spokesman for the Ministry of Defense.

Amer Sattar was a former mujahideen leader who was killed with four others in an operation by the NDS special unit in the north of Kabul on January 19.

The human rights commission said that the government has also failed to share the details of the killing of at least 10 civilians during an air raid in Balkh province ten days ago.

“Unfortunately the perpetrators behind the civilian casualties weren’t prosecuted to the full extent,” said Behzad Hakak, a member of AIHRC.

Meanwhile, family members of some of the victims gathered in Kabul where they demanded justice to be served and the perpetrators of civilian deaths punished.

“One of my nephews asks me about when my father will come back, but I make fake promises to him that your father will return when the war ends and peace comes,” said Noria, who has lost family members in the war.

“No religion allows the killing of women and children,” said Mohammad Sadiq, a resident in Kabul.

According to rights groups, in most cases, fact-finding commissions are politically influenced.

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