Latest news
تصویر بندانگشتی

Double Standard Toward Criminals: CE Abdullah's Office

The Chief Executive's Office said Wednesday that there is a double standard in the detention and prosecution of those accused of corruption or found guilty by justice and judicial institutions.

Earlier, the Attorney General's Office stated their decision to imprison more than seven thousand seven hundred criminals, but the office now does not provide current information about whether or not these sentences were implemented or not.

But a number of lawyers and parliament members accuse government agencies of nepotism in practicing law and order against the perpetrators and criminals.

About a year ago, the Attorney General's office said that nearly 8,000 people whose detention orders were issued by the judicial authorities are living freely, but know, more than a year later, the Attorney General's office doesn't give any information about the implementation of those orders.

“The Ministry of Interior and Attorney General's office are responsible for the task of implementing and enforcing court orders and should be accountable to the people of Afghanistan and to the country's law,” said Rouhullah Sakhizada, a lawyer.

Keramuddin Karim, former head of soccer in Afghanistan, Zemarai Paikan, former commander of the Afghan Public Protection Force, Wasima Badghisi, former IEC's operational deputy head, General Abdul Rashid Dustom's bodyguards, Haseeb-e-Quai Markaz (a man who is wanted on the list of the Ministry of Interior Affairs), Ahmad Zia Yaftali, former head of the Afghan National Army's Health Department and an MP from Badakhshan, Afzal Shamel, a senator, and Mohammad Mirza Katawazi, a current parliament member, are the people whose arrest warrant has been issued by the Attorney General's office or a court in recent months or year but which so far have not been arrested.

“Law applies to persons without political support, but offenders and individuals supported by top politicians and high-ranking officials do not apply,” said Ali Akbar Jamshidi, a parliament member.

The mentioned men have previously denied the allegations against themselves, but the Attorney General's Office says that Afzal has been released on bail, and that the case of Mirza Mohammad Katawazi has been terminated due to the delay in punishment.

“Unfortunately, their actions are based on political nepotism and a large part of their own (government) officials are corrupt, so somehow there is collusion and cooperation between them,” said Bashir Ahmad Tayanj, former MP.

The Ministry of Interior protested the claims, saying it has made efforts to enforce the verdicts issued by the judicial bodies, but the Chief Executive's office says there has been a double standard in arrests of those accused of corruption.

“Unfortunately, there has always been a double standard with these practices in Afghanistan, and now I see no reason not to do so,” said Mujib Rahimi, Chief Executive Abdullah's spokesman.

“In the past fifteen days, there have been 45 judicial warrants issued and individuals have been arrested and referred to judicial bodies,” said Nusrat Rahimi, the Interior Ministry's spokesman.

The Attorney General's Office has not given any information about the implementation of those orders--concerning accused individuals --for the past year.

Double Standard Toward Criminals: CE Abdullah's Office

"In the past fifteen days, there have been 45 warrants issued, and individuals have been arrested and referred to the judicial bodies,” said Rahimi, MoI spokesman.

تصویر بندانگشتی

The Chief Executive's Office said Wednesday that there is a double standard in the detention and prosecution of those accused of corruption or found guilty by justice and judicial institutions.

Earlier, the Attorney General's Office stated their decision to imprison more than seven thousand seven hundred criminals, but the office now does not provide current information about whether or not these sentences were implemented or not.

But a number of lawyers and parliament members accuse government agencies of nepotism in practicing law and order against the perpetrators and criminals.

About a year ago, the Attorney General's office said that nearly 8,000 people whose detention orders were issued by the judicial authorities are living freely, but know, more than a year later, the Attorney General's office doesn't give any information about the implementation of those orders.

“The Ministry of Interior and Attorney General's office are responsible for the task of implementing and enforcing court orders and should be accountable to the people of Afghanistan and to the country's law,” said Rouhullah Sakhizada, a lawyer.

Keramuddin Karim, former head of soccer in Afghanistan, Zemarai Paikan, former commander of the Afghan Public Protection Force, Wasima Badghisi, former IEC's operational deputy head, General Abdul Rashid Dustom's bodyguards, Haseeb-e-Quai Markaz (a man who is wanted on the list of the Ministry of Interior Affairs), Ahmad Zia Yaftali, former head of the Afghan National Army's Health Department and an MP from Badakhshan, Afzal Shamel, a senator, and Mohammad Mirza Katawazi, a current parliament member, are the people whose arrest warrant has been issued by the Attorney General's office or a court in recent months or year but which so far have not been arrested.

“Law applies to persons without political support, but offenders and individuals supported by top politicians and high-ranking officials do not apply,” said Ali Akbar Jamshidi, a parliament member.

The mentioned men have previously denied the allegations against themselves, but the Attorney General's Office says that Afzal has been released on bail, and that the case of Mirza Mohammad Katawazi has been terminated due to the delay in punishment.

“Unfortunately, their actions are based on political nepotism and a large part of their own (government) officials are corrupt, so somehow there is collusion and cooperation between them,” said Bashir Ahmad Tayanj, former MP.

The Ministry of Interior protested the claims, saying it has made efforts to enforce the verdicts issued by the judicial bodies, but the Chief Executive's office says there has been a double standard in arrests of those accused of corruption.

“Unfortunately, there has always been a double standard with these practices in Afghanistan, and now I see no reason not to do so,” said Mujib Rahimi, Chief Executive Abdullah's spokesman.

“In the past fifteen days, there have been 45 judicial warrants issued and individuals have been arrested and referred to judicial bodies,” said Nusrat Rahimi, the Interior Ministry's spokesman.

The Attorney General's Office has not given any information about the implementation of those orders--concerning accused individuals --for the past year.

Share this post