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Officials from President Ashraf Ghani’s office and Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah’s offices – which are separated by a wall and connected by a narrow road – are preparing for separate swearing-in ceremonies on Monday despite efforts by politicians to find a solution for the problem.

Abdullah’s office confirmed that US special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad on Monday held three meetings with the chief executive to “find a solution” for the matter but has not succeeded. Despite that, Abdullah’s deputy spokesman, Fraidoon Khwazoon, said hopes still remain.

Khwazoon said efforts are underway by Afghan and foreign politicians to end the crisis.

“We have presented our plan to Mr. Khalilzad to give it to the other side (Ghani’s office). Their plan has been received by us through Mr. Khalilzad. So far, we have not reached a tangible result,” said Fraidoon Khwazoon, a spokesman for Abdullah Abdullah.

Ghani was announced the winner by the Independent Election Commission amid controversy involving technical problems and allegations of fraud. 

The electoral crisis heightened after the final results were announced by the IEC on February 19.

“A big number of national and foreign guests will attend this glorious event,” said Durrani Waziri, a presidential spokesperson.

Afghan politicians remain concerned about the future of an attempt to hold two oath-taking ceremonies in a single day, believing it will lead the country into a new crisis. 

The former head of the National Directorate of Security, Rahmatullah Nabil, who also ran for president, said holding two swearing-in ceremonies is “dangerous” for the country and it will affect the morale of the Afghan security forces.

“Let’s assume that two oath-taking ceremonies happened. In this case, two lists will be presented for the (intra-Afghan) talks with two different agendas,” Nabil said.

“Afghanistan’s political and social order will be disrupted if there are two swearing-in ceremonies. Meanwhile, security in cities will be disrupted and the government’s financial resources, which are under control of some individuals, will be ‘looted,’” said analyst Shahab Hakimi.

Khalilzad has met with Abdullah's team "three times" but still no resolution, said Abdullah's office. 

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Officials from President Ashraf Ghani’s office and Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah’s offices – which are separated by a wall and connected by a narrow road – are preparing for separate swearing-in ceremonies on Monday despite efforts by politicians to find a solution for the problem.

Abdullah’s office confirmed that US special envoy Zalmay Khalilzad on Monday held three meetings with the chief executive to “find a solution” for the matter but has not succeeded. Despite that, Abdullah’s deputy spokesman, Fraidoon Khwazoon, said hopes still remain.

Khwazoon said efforts are underway by Afghan and foreign politicians to end the crisis.

“We have presented our plan to Mr. Khalilzad to give it to the other side (Ghani’s office). Their plan has been received by us through Mr. Khalilzad. So far, we have not reached a tangible result,” said Fraidoon Khwazoon, a spokesman for Abdullah Abdullah.

Ghani was announced the winner by the Independent Election Commission amid controversy involving technical problems and allegations of fraud. 

The electoral crisis heightened after the final results were announced by the IEC on February 19.

“A big number of national and foreign guests will attend this glorious event,” said Durrani Waziri, a presidential spokesperson.

Afghan politicians remain concerned about the future of an attempt to hold two oath-taking ceremonies in a single day, believing it will lead the country into a new crisis. 

The former head of the National Directorate of Security, Rahmatullah Nabil, who also ran for president, said holding two swearing-in ceremonies is “dangerous” for the country and it will affect the morale of the Afghan security forces.

“Let’s assume that two oath-taking ceremonies happened. In this case, two lists will be presented for the (intra-Afghan) talks with two different agendas,” Nabil said.

“Afghanistan’s political and social order will be disrupted if there are two swearing-in ceremonies. Meanwhile, security in cities will be disrupted and the government’s financial resources, which are under control of some individuals, will be ‘looted,’” said analyst Shahab Hakimi.

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