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Kangaroo Courts Increased in Afghanistan in 1396

The Independent Human Rights Commission of (AIHRC) on Tuesday said kangaroo courts significantly increased in Afghanistan during 1396 and that local lawbreakers and elements from armed anti-government groups were involved.

Meanwhile, the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) has said that the majority of people involved in these illegal courts were brought to justice. 

“Bringing the criminal to justice indicates that the attorney general is committed to implementing the law without any hesitation,” said AGO spokesman Jamshid Rasuli.

Despite rising hopes that 1396 would be the year of rule of law and justice, local lawbreakers and armed opponents organized at least nine kangaroo courts in Takhar, Badakhshan, Ghor and Faryab provinces. 

Decrees were publicly issued by these courts against 17 people, both males and females. 

In the month of Dalwa (January), a commander of an illegal armed group severely punished a 22-year-old girl in Chah Ab district of northern Takhar province in public. 

During 1396, the Taliban lashed a young man and woman in Faryab district after they organized their own love marriage.  

“These events were among the most horrific events, last year at least 12 people were killed in kangaroo courts and five others were lashed, these events are really shocking,” said AIHRC spokesman Bilal Sediqqi.

Law experts however have said that some of the kangaroo courts were held in areas where government is in control but that officials did not have the will to take action against such elements. 

“The main problem regarding this issue comes from the capital of the country, when the criminals are not tackled according to the law in the capital, then how can we expect that government’s laws are implemented in remote regions,” said legal expert Abdul Subhan Misbah.

According to legal experts, the mistrust among the public about the fairness of the legal and judicial institutions and the lack of rule of law in remote areas have afforded local lawbreakers and armed anti-government groups the opportunity to hold illegal courts.

Kangaroo Courts Increased in Afghanistan in 1396

The Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission said at least 12 people have been killed after illegal court rulings this year. 

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The Independent Human Rights Commission of (AIHRC) on Tuesday said kangaroo courts significantly increased in Afghanistan during 1396 and that local lawbreakers and elements from armed anti-government groups were involved.

Meanwhile, the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) has said that the majority of people involved in these illegal courts were brought to justice. 

“Bringing the criminal to justice indicates that the attorney general is committed to implementing the law without any hesitation,” said AGO spokesman Jamshid Rasuli.

Despite rising hopes that 1396 would be the year of rule of law and justice, local lawbreakers and armed opponents organized at least nine kangaroo courts in Takhar, Badakhshan, Ghor and Faryab provinces. 

Decrees were publicly issued by these courts against 17 people, both males and females. 

In the month of Dalwa (January), a commander of an illegal armed group severely punished a 22-year-old girl in Chah Ab district of northern Takhar province in public. 

During 1396, the Taliban lashed a young man and woman in Faryab district after they organized their own love marriage.  

“These events were among the most horrific events, last year at least 12 people were killed in kangaroo courts and five others were lashed, these events are really shocking,” said AIHRC spokesman Bilal Sediqqi.

Law experts however have said that some of the kangaroo courts were held in areas where government is in control but that officials did not have the will to take action against such elements. 

“The main problem regarding this issue comes from the capital of the country, when the criminals are not tackled according to the law in the capital, then how can we expect that government’s laws are implemented in remote regions,” said legal expert Abdul Subhan Misbah.

According to legal experts, the mistrust among the public about the fairness of the legal and judicial institutions and the lack of rule of law in remote areas have afforded local lawbreakers and armed anti-government groups the opportunity to hold illegal courts.

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