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Afghanistan

Lawmakers, Residents Criticize Roads Closure, Ask For Reforms

As the anti-government protests enter its ninth day, a number of MPs, members of Kabul Provincial Council and residents of Kabul said on Saturday that they are tired of roads closure and that government should take measures to end the situation.

A number of lawmakers said they support the protesters’ demands for reforms but the sit-in camps established in many parts of the city must be removed in order to prevent roads closure.

“I urge President (Ashraf Ghani) to reach an agreement with the protesters and accept their legal demands,” said Humayun Humayun, the first deputy speaker of the Wolesi Jirga (Lower House of Parliament).

“This situation is not in favor of Afghans. The demands of the protesters must be heard and the problem should be resolved,” said Fatima Aziz, an MP from Kunduz.

The protestors have established sit-in camps in eight locations in Kabul city in a move to put pressure on government to bring reforms and dismiss security heads including the national security advisor Mohammad Haneef Atmar.

“I have walked from Quwai Markaz road to the Emergency Hospital (in Shahre Naw). The road is closed and I have to walk back to Quwai Markaz,” said Mustafa, a resident of Kabul.

In order to prevent any security incident, government has closed a number of roads by locating containers.

Some of the closed roads are the Ministry of Foreign Affairs road to Zanbaq Square, the Sherpoor Square and the Wazir Mohammad Akbar Khan 15th street in Kabul’s PD10.

A number of Kabul residents said the roads closure has faced them with huge problems.

“We are really tired. Roads are closed everywhere in the city. There are tents everywhere. Government must do something,” said Kabir, a driver.

“Our customers have vanished, our business has been affected by the roads closure,” said Nematullah, a shopkeeper.

The protests came after a deadly truck bombing in Kabul on May 31, killing at least 150 people and wounding hundreds others.

The protests however turned violent after security forces reportedly opened fire on protestors. At least five members of the rally were killed in the shooting.

Following the incidents, the protestors established several sit-in camps across the city and named their campaign as the “Uprising for Change Movement”. 

Afghanistan

Lawmakers, Residents Criticize Roads Closure, Ask For Reforms

Some MPs said they support the protestors’ demands but added that the sit-in camps must be removed from the city

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As the anti-government protests enter its ninth day, a number of MPs, members of Kabul Provincial Council and residents of Kabul said on Saturday that they are tired of roads closure and that government should take measures to end the situation.

A number of lawmakers said they support the protesters’ demands for reforms but the sit-in camps established in many parts of the city must be removed in order to prevent roads closure.

“I urge President (Ashraf Ghani) to reach an agreement with the protesters and accept their legal demands,” said Humayun Humayun, the first deputy speaker of the Wolesi Jirga (Lower House of Parliament).

“This situation is not in favor of Afghans. The demands of the protesters must be heard and the problem should be resolved,” said Fatima Aziz, an MP from Kunduz.

The protestors have established sit-in camps in eight locations in Kabul city in a move to put pressure on government to bring reforms and dismiss security heads including the national security advisor Mohammad Haneef Atmar.

“I have walked from Quwai Markaz road to the Emergency Hospital (in Shahre Naw). The road is closed and I have to walk back to Quwai Markaz,” said Mustafa, a resident of Kabul.

In order to prevent any security incident, government has closed a number of roads by locating containers.

Some of the closed roads are the Ministry of Foreign Affairs road to Zanbaq Square, the Sherpoor Square and the Wazir Mohammad Akbar Khan 15th street in Kabul’s PD10.

A number of Kabul residents said the roads closure has faced them with huge problems.

“We are really tired. Roads are closed everywhere in the city. There are tents everywhere. Government must do something,” said Kabir, a driver.

“Our customers have vanished, our business has been affected by the roads closure,” said Nematullah, a shopkeeper.

The protests came after a deadly truck bombing in Kabul on May 31, killing at least 150 people and wounding hundreds others.

The protests however turned violent after security forces reportedly opened fire on protestors. At least five members of the rally were killed in the shooting.

Following the incidents, the protestors established several sit-in camps across the city and named their campaign as the “Uprising for Change Movement”. 

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