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Afghanistan

NUG’s Security Policy Sparks Debate After Court Bombing

As Afghans across the country on Wednesday mourned the deaths of over 20 victims in Tuesday’s suicide attack on the Supreme Court, debate around the security policy of the National Unity Government (NUG) was rekindled.

Members of the public raised their voices around the issue of what government is doing to prevent such attacks on the capital.  

Relatives and families of the Supreme Court attack victims on Wednesday said NUG leaders have failed to dispel security threats against civilians. 

They also questioned the appointments made by NUG leaders in security institutions, saying the NUG has appointed those people in the security institutions who do not have the experience to deal with threats against the country. 

The suicide attack on the Supreme Court has devastated the lives of so many Afghans. 

Bibi Hajji is an Afghan woman who lost her daughter-in-law and her fourteen year old granddaughter in the attack. A second granddaughter was injured in the blast.  

Her daughter-in-law and two granddaughters were on their way home from hospital when the suicide attacker detonated his explosives inside the car park of the court complex. 

One of Bibi Hajji’s granddaughters was wounded. 

“I am devastated, they hardly managed to get bread, we live in a rented house, I am burning, I am destroyed,” said Bibi Hajji. 

Bibi Hajji’s son is unemployed and her daughter-in-law was the breadwinner of the family, she said. 

“They (terrorists) kill the poor and the oppressed and the innocent, my wife took my daughter to the doctor, my small daughter is lying in blood at hospital,” said one victim’s husband Jan Aqa. 

“Why are terrorists doing it, why is the government not preventing this,” said one victim’s son, Mahshad. 

Another mother, who was the breadwinner in her family - of twelve children – was also killed in the attack.

She had worked for the Supreme Court for 20 years. For her family, this is yet another tragedy to strike. Her eldest son had been in the Afghan National Army but was the victim of an IED explosion – which left him disabled. 

“My poor aunt is very young, she was working in a house to feed her children,” said the victim’s nephew Khadija.

“They killed my mother, if they (terrorists) have a little bit of courage, they should come and face me, if I had a gun, I would eliminate all of them,” said another victim’s son, Farid.

The ongoing conflict in the country is taking a huge toll on civilians. Just this week UNAMA released its annual report for 2016 and documented almost 3,500 deaths among civilians in the country last year. 

Afghanistan

NUG’s Security Policy Sparks Debate After Court Bombing

Members of the public have raised questions around the issue of what government is doing to prevent deadly attacks on the capital.

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As Afghans across the country on Wednesday mourned the deaths of over 20 victims in Tuesday’s suicide attack on the Supreme Court, debate around the security policy of the National Unity Government (NUG) was rekindled.

Members of the public raised their voices around the issue of what government is doing to prevent such attacks on the capital.  

Relatives and families of the Supreme Court attack victims on Wednesday said NUG leaders have failed to dispel security threats against civilians. 

They also questioned the appointments made by NUG leaders in security institutions, saying the NUG has appointed those people in the security institutions who do not have the experience to deal with threats against the country. 

The suicide attack on the Supreme Court has devastated the lives of so many Afghans. 

Bibi Hajji is an Afghan woman who lost her daughter-in-law and her fourteen year old granddaughter in the attack. A second granddaughter was injured in the blast.  

Her daughter-in-law and two granddaughters were on their way home from hospital when the suicide attacker detonated his explosives inside the car park of the court complex. 

One of Bibi Hajji’s granddaughters was wounded. 

“I am devastated, they hardly managed to get bread, we live in a rented house, I am burning, I am destroyed,” said Bibi Hajji. 

Bibi Hajji’s son is unemployed and her daughter-in-law was the breadwinner of the family, she said. 

“They (terrorists) kill the poor and the oppressed and the innocent, my wife took my daughter to the doctor, my small daughter is lying in blood at hospital,” said one victim’s husband Jan Aqa. 

“Why are terrorists doing it, why is the government not preventing this,” said one victim’s son, Mahshad. 

Another mother, who was the breadwinner in her family - of twelve children – was also killed in the attack.

She had worked for the Supreme Court for 20 years. For her family, this is yet another tragedy to strike. Her eldest son had been in the Afghan National Army but was the victim of an IED explosion – which left him disabled. 

“My poor aunt is very young, she was working in a house to feed her children,” said the victim’s nephew Khadija.

“They killed my mother, if they (terrorists) have a little bit of courage, they should come and face me, if I had a gun, I would eliminate all of them,” said another victim’s son, Farid.

The ongoing conflict in the country is taking a huge toll on civilians. Just this week UNAMA released its annual report for 2016 and documented almost 3,500 deaths among civilians in the country last year. 

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