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Afghanistan

Private Guards Illegally Dressing in Police and Military Uniforms

Kabul residents said Friday that private security guards of MPs are committing crimes while wearing the uniforms of Afghan police and military.

“Police uniforms should be different, army uniforms should be different, and MP’s guards should never dress with the security forces uniforms,” said a resident.

“The Speaker of Parliament and the MPs should share this issue with the Ministry of Interior, and the Ministry of Interior should choose a uniform for the guards,” said Mirza Mohammad Yarmand, a former Interior Ministry deputy.

The National Security Council said they will soon prepare a policy for carrying weapons and wearing uniforms by parliament member’s guards, and guards of other politicians.

“Issues like weapons for bodyguards, uniforms, or other matters related to politicians and parliamentarians should be addressed,” said Kabir Haqmal, spokesman for the National Security Council.

The former deputy speaker of the Wolesi Jirga (the Lower House of Parliament) Humayun Humayun, who retains many guards dressed in security forces’ uniforms, blames the Ministry of Interior for neglecting to address the need for MP bodyguard uniforms.

“They (Ministry of Interior) have never determined a specific uniform for the security guards of the MPs,” said Humayun.

The Ministry of the Interior and the House of Representatives have agreed to address the problems associated with security for MPs, specifically regarding carrying weapons, vehicle’s license plates and uniforms.

“The Ministry of Internal Affairs is working with the National Security Council on specific procedures to solve the problems regarding weapons, vehicles and uniforms by the end of March next year,” said the Interior Ministry's Nusrat Rahimi.

This comes several days after the Afghan police and lawmakers faced off over the use of armored vehicles and unregistered license plates.

A list issued by the Ministry of Interior shows that over 110 members of the parliament have not received licenses for the weapons they or their bodyguards are carrying.

Afghanistan

Private Guards Illegally Dressing in Police and Military Uniforms

The National Security Council said they will soon prepare a policy for carrying weapons and wearing uniforms by parliament member’s guards.

Thumbnail

Kabul residents said Friday that private security guards of MPs are committing crimes while wearing the uniforms of Afghan police and military.

“Police uniforms should be different, army uniforms should be different, and MP’s guards should never dress with the security forces uniforms,” said a resident.

“The Speaker of Parliament and the MPs should share this issue with the Ministry of Interior, and the Ministry of Interior should choose a uniform for the guards,” said Mirza Mohammad Yarmand, a former Interior Ministry deputy.

The National Security Council said they will soon prepare a policy for carrying weapons and wearing uniforms by parliament member’s guards, and guards of other politicians.

“Issues like weapons for bodyguards, uniforms, or other matters related to politicians and parliamentarians should be addressed,” said Kabir Haqmal, spokesman for the National Security Council.

The former deputy speaker of the Wolesi Jirga (the Lower House of Parliament) Humayun Humayun, who retains many guards dressed in security forces’ uniforms, blames the Ministry of Interior for neglecting to address the need for MP bodyguard uniforms.

“They (Ministry of Interior) have never determined a specific uniform for the security guards of the MPs,” said Humayun.

The Ministry of the Interior and the House of Representatives have agreed to address the problems associated with security for MPs, specifically regarding carrying weapons, vehicle’s license plates and uniforms.

“The Ministry of Internal Affairs is working with the National Security Council on specific procedures to solve the problems regarding weapons, vehicles and uniforms by the end of March next year,” said the Interior Ministry's Nusrat Rahimi.

This comes several days after the Afghan police and lawmakers faced off over the use of armored vehicles and unregistered license plates.

A list issued by the Ministry of Interior shows that over 110 members of the parliament have not received licenses for the weapons they or their bodyguards are carrying.

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