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تصویر بندانگشتی

Women's Presence in Afghan Media Increased Despite Challenges: AFJC

The Afghanistan Journalists Center (AFJC) said that the presence of women in the country's media has increased compared to previous years.

According to the center, after the Islamic Emirate took over the country, about 600 women were active in the country's media, but this number has increased to 700 over the past year.

"After the political changes in Afghanistan, 600 women were working in the media, but fortunately today, 700 women are working in various media," said Mirajuddin Rahimi, a representative of  AFJC.

The head of the department of Information and Culture of Balkh, Ata Mohammad Saho, said: "In Afghanistan, the mass media law is currently enforceable, and no restrictions have been imposed. We are actively working in Balkh province and have better coordination."

Radio Banowan is a private media outlet in Badakhshan province managed by a woman, where currently 15 women are actively working.

Najla Shirzad, director of Radio Banowan, said: "Overall, at Sadai-e-Banowan (Voice of Women) radio station, approximately 15 young ladies are active here, and all personnel are females."

"Regarding the challenges we face in the media, the most significant are economic challenges because I work here voluntarily," said Najia Matin, a radio employee.

A number of journalists, on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, called for the legal ratification of mass media law, access to information, and addressing their economic challenges.

"We ask the interim government to ratify the law that has gone to Kandahar for approval by the leader of the Islamic Emirate as soon as possible because we do not know what kind of work to do," said Mohammad Naser, a journalist from Kunar. 

"Due to the absence of media laws, we journalists in Takhar often face a lack of access to information, and authorities do not provide information to us on time,” said Saddam Hussain, a journalist from Takhar.

Lack of access to information and poor economic conditions are other challenges faced by journalists in the country.
"We really work impartially, we work hard, please support us, be cooperative with us," said Sajad Mosawi, a journalist from Balkh.

According to officials at the Afghanistan Journalists Center, after the return of the Islamic Emirate, in addition to 30 new media outlets, 27 other media that were previously inactive have also started operating, and currently, in 470 public media outlets, more than 5,000 individuals are actively working.

Women's Presence in Afghan Media Increased Despite Challenges: AFJC

Radio Banowan is a private media outlet in Badakhshan province managed by a woman, where currently 15 women are actively working.

تصویر بندانگشتی

The Afghanistan Journalists Center (AFJC) said that the presence of women in the country's media has increased compared to previous years.

According to the center, after the Islamic Emirate took over the country, about 600 women were active in the country's media, but this number has increased to 700 over the past year.

"After the political changes in Afghanistan, 600 women were working in the media, but fortunately today, 700 women are working in various media," said Mirajuddin Rahimi, a representative of  AFJC.

The head of the department of Information and Culture of Balkh, Ata Mohammad Saho, said: "In Afghanistan, the mass media law is currently enforceable, and no restrictions have been imposed. We are actively working in Balkh province and have better coordination."

Radio Banowan is a private media outlet in Badakhshan province managed by a woman, where currently 15 women are actively working.

Najla Shirzad, director of Radio Banowan, said: "Overall, at Sadai-e-Banowan (Voice of Women) radio station, approximately 15 young ladies are active here, and all personnel are females."

"Regarding the challenges we face in the media, the most significant are economic challenges because I work here voluntarily," said Najia Matin, a radio employee.

A number of journalists, on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, called for the legal ratification of mass media law, access to information, and addressing their economic challenges.

"We ask the interim government to ratify the law that has gone to Kandahar for approval by the leader of the Islamic Emirate as soon as possible because we do not know what kind of work to do," said Mohammad Naser, a journalist from Kunar. 

"Due to the absence of media laws, we journalists in Takhar often face a lack of access to information, and authorities do not provide information to us on time,” said Saddam Hussain, a journalist from Takhar.

Lack of access to information and poor economic conditions are other challenges faced by journalists in the country.
"We really work impartially, we work hard, please support us, be cooperative with us," said Sajad Mosawi, a journalist from Balkh.

According to officials at the Afghanistan Journalists Center, after the return of the Islamic Emirate, in addition to 30 new media outlets, 27 other media that were previously inactive have also started operating, and currently, in 470 public media outlets, more than 5,000 individuals are actively working.

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