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Taliban Not Pakistan's Enemy: Pakistani Senator

Mushahid Hussain Syed, the head of Pakistan's Senate Defense Committee, told TOLOnews the Taliban is not Pakistan's enemy and that the Afghan Taliban is not a threat to Islamabad.

"Afghan Taliban is not considered as an enemy on Pakistan soil," the senator said.

"Another point is that at the peace talks in Muree in July there were Taliban and Haqqani network representatives along with representatives of the Afghan government, China and US. The decision is now up to you [Afghanistan] whether you want to come up with war with Taliban or peace with them," he added.

He also said: "If you [Afghans] want peace you should come to the table of negotiations with the [Afghan] Taliban."

Hussain Syed praised China's efforts for regional peace – especially for peace in Afghanistan, and said: "Terrorist activities in Afghanistan and Pakistan affects China's situation – particularly in Xinjiang province."

"China has a vital role in regional peace therefore it has proved that it wants peace in Afghanistan," he said.

Afghan analysts meanwhile said they do not believe Pakistan's promises of supporting peace in Afghanistan.

"Pakistan has not fulfilled its commitments so far. We do not trust Pakistan's promises which it has made or makes towards Afghanistan," said Omar Sharifi, an Afghan analyst in political affairs.

He said Pakistan should take practical steps in this aspect. "We want Pakistan to take practical steps," he added.

Another analyst referred to Kabul's comments about security in the country. "Kabul believes that insecurity in Afghanistan affects regional countries, and peace in Afghanistan means peace in regional countries," he added.

"We want Pakistan to kick start joint combat with Afghanistan against terrorism as it would be effective for security in both neighboring countries," he said.

The comments come as the Taliban group has divided into two clusters amid a growing presence of Daesh in Afghanistan. The analysts say such changes can hamper the peace process in war-hit Afghanistan.

Taliban Not Pakistan's Enemy: Pakistani Senator

Mushahid Hussain Syed, the head of Pakistan's Senate Defense Committee, told TOLOnews the Taliban

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Mushahid Hussain Syed, the head of Pakistan's Senate Defense Committee, told TOLOnews the Taliban is not Pakistan's enemy and that the Afghan Taliban is not a threat to Islamabad.

"Afghan Taliban is not considered as an enemy on Pakistan soil," the senator said.

"Another point is that at the peace talks in Muree in July there were Taliban and Haqqani network representatives along with representatives of the Afghan government, China and US. The decision is now up to you [Afghanistan] whether you want to come up with war with Taliban or peace with them," he added.

He also said: "If you [Afghans] want peace you should come to the table of negotiations with the [Afghan] Taliban."

Hussain Syed praised China's efforts for regional peace – especially for peace in Afghanistan, and said: "Terrorist activities in Afghanistan and Pakistan affects China's situation – particularly in Xinjiang province."

"China has a vital role in regional peace therefore it has proved that it wants peace in Afghanistan," he said.

Afghan analysts meanwhile said they do not believe Pakistan's promises of supporting peace in Afghanistan.

"Pakistan has not fulfilled its commitments so far. We do not trust Pakistan's promises which it has made or makes towards Afghanistan," said Omar Sharifi, an Afghan analyst in political affairs.

He said Pakistan should take practical steps in this aspect. "We want Pakistan to take practical steps," he added.

Another analyst referred to Kabul's comments about security in the country. "Kabul believes that insecurity in Afghanistan affects regional countries, and peace in Afghanistan means peace in regional countries," he added.

"We want Pakistan to kick start joint combat with Afghanistan against terrorism as it would be effective for security in both neighboring countries," he said.

The comments come as the Taliban group has divided into two clusters amid a growing presence of Daesh in Afghanistan. The analysts say such changes can hamper the peace process in war-hit Afghanistan.

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