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Musical Band Seeks to Revive Traditional Music of Khorasan

A group of youths in Kabul have been trying to revive the Khorasan music in the country, the traditional epic Persian music.

The teenagers—the majority of them the girls--call their band “Bazm-e-Wahdat” and are seeking to include Mystical and Sufi poems from prominent Persian poets Jalaluddin Muhammad Balkhi (Rumi)--a 13th century Persian poet and theologian--and Hakim Nasir Khusraw, a Persian poet, philosopher and one of the greatest writers in Persian literature.

According to the musical band, the traditional music of Khorasan is currently used only in at mystical and Sufi gatherings in Pamiri regions of Badakhshan, the northern areas of Pakistan and in Tajikistan.

“We do not have anyone in both lives except the God,” excerpt from a mystic poem of Rumi.

“We established this band five years ago. I was interested in music and wanted to be part of this band. For the past two years, I am playing Rubab (a lute-like musical instrument originating from central Afghanistan),” said Armaghan Raufi, a Rubab player.

“In this type of music, we normally select the mystic poems of Rumi and Hakim Nasir Khusraw,” said Anbarin Samadi, a member of the band.

“Tradition music of Khorasan is about 1,000 years old; it’s still alive in the Pamir regions of Afghanistan’s Badakhshan province,” said Habiburrahman Raufi, founder of the band.

Arts & Culture

Musical Band Seeks to Revive Traditional Music of Khorasan

“We do not have anyone in both lives except the God,” excerpt from a mystic poem of Rumi.

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A group of youths in Kabul have been trying to revive the Khorasan music in the country, the traditional epic Persian music.

The teenagers—the majority of them the girls--call their band “Bazm-e-Wahdat” and are seeking to include Mystical and Sufi poems from prominent Persian poets Jalaluddin Muhammad Balkhi (Rumi)--a 13th century Persian poet and theologian--and Hakim Nasir Khusraw, a Persian poet, philosopher and one of the greatest writers in Persian literature.

According to the musical band, the traditional music of Khorasan is currently used only in at mystical and Sufi gatherings in Pamiri regions of Badakhshan, the northern areas of Pakistan and in Tajikistan.

“We do not have anyone in both lives except the God,” excerpt from a mystic poem of Rumi.

“We established this band five years ago. I was interested in music and wanted to be part of this band. For the past two years, I am playing Rubab (a lute-like musical instrument originating from central Afghanistan),” said Armaghan Raufi, a Rubab player.

“In this type of music, we normally select the mystic poems of Rumi and Hakim Nasir Khusraw,” said Anbarin Samadi, a member of the band.

“Tradition music of Khorasan is about 1,000 years old; it’s still alive in the Pamir regions of Afghanistan’s Badakhshan province,” said Habiburrahman Raufi, founder of the band.

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