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Kabul Still Dark Amid Uzbekistan Power Cut

Kabul had only 20 minutes of electricity over the past 24 hours following a technical problem that stopped the supply of Uzbekistan’s electricity to Afghanistan.

Critics note that Da Afghanistan Breshna Sherkat (DABS), Afghanistan’s main power supply company, pays $100 million to Uzbekistan annually, but it does not know when the power shortage problem will come to an end.

Meanwhile, social media users have also criticized President Ashraf Ghani for what they described as his failed policies to ensure power generation from domestic sources.

“We expect our countrymen to be patient, because it is a technical failure, we are not responsible for controlling it,” said Wahidullah Tawhidi, a spokesman for DABS.

“I don’t know whether the head of DABS hears our voice, or has any mercy on this country,” said Abdul Bashir Faqiri, a resident in Kabul.

“We had 15 minutes of electricity in the past 24 hours, our problems are never solved,” said Shamsulhaq, a resident in Kabul.

President Ashraf Ghani pledged greater domestic electricity sources during his first term.

“This year we will generate more electricity--what we couldn't achieve in the past 100 years,” said Ghani in 2014.

“All financial resources are spent on those areas which are not in the interest of the people,” said Shafi Samim, an economist.

Afghanistan presently imports 450 megawatts of power from Uzbekistan. With the cut from Uzbekistan, now the government has only the capacity to provide 160 megawatt from domestic sources.

Kabul Still Dark Amid Uzbekistan Power Cut

President Ashraf Ghani pledged greater domestic electricity sources during his first term.

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Kabul had only 20 minutes of electricity over the past 24 hours following a technical problem that stopped the supply of Uzbekistan’s electricity to Afghanistan.

Critics note that Da Afghanistan Breshna Sherkat (DABS), Afghanistan’s main power supply company, pays $100 million to Uzbekistan annually, but it does not know when the power shortage problem will come to an end.

Meanwhile, social media users have also criticized President Ashraf Ghani for what they described as his failed policies to ensure power generation from domestic sources.

“We expect our countrymen to be patient, because it is a technical failure, we are not responsible for controlling it,” said Wahidullah Tawhidi, a spokesman for DABS.

“I don’t know whether the head of DABS hears our voice, or has any mercy on this country,” said Abdul Bashir Faqiri, a resident in Kabul.

“We had 15 minutes of electricity in the past 24 hours, our problems are never solved,” said Shamsulhaq, a resident in Kabul.

President Ashraf Ghani pledged greater domestic electricity sources during his first term.

“This year we will generate more electricity--what we couldn't achieve in the past 100 years,” said Ghani in 2014.

“All financial resources are spent on those areas which are not in the interest of the people,” said Shafi Samim, an economist.

Afghanistan presently imports 450 megawatts of power from Uzbekistan. With the cut from Uzbekistan, now the government has only the capacity to provide 160 megawatt from domestic sources.

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