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تصویر بندانگشتی

In First, Technical 'C Check' on Airplane Done in Kabul

Afghan engineers have completed a "C check," or deep technical inspection, of an Airbus aircraft at Kabul Airport for the first time.

Abdul Hadi Hamdan, director of Kabul Airport, said that in twenty-eight working days, the plane became certified to fly and the cost of its "C check" has been greatly reduced.

“In the past it used to cost $1.5 million, but now, by our Afghan colleagues and with the coordination and leadership of Ariana Aviation, the cost has dropped to two hundred thousand dollars,” Hamdan said.

Afghanistan has previously sent its huge Airbus planes overseas for technical inspections and C checks. Ariana Aviation Company's CEO, Rahmatullah Agha, said the company's planes are now travelling to Turkey, Qatar, Russia, Pakistan, Iran, and other countries.

According to the CEO of Ariana Aviation, the company expects to invest thirty to forty million dollars on four passenger planes.

Technicians from a domestic aviation company said that the aircraft's "C check" and technical inspection were completed in collaboration with Airbus company.

“We had a very good work team that could perform the “C check” on time,” said Ahmad Seyar, the engineer.

“The 560 task cards which were issued by Airbus have been fully implemented,” said Mohammad Homayoun Stanekzai, director of flight safety.

Afghanistan now has two airlines that fly to and from various countries. The flights of major aviation companies are scheduled to resume at Kabul Airport as aviation in Afghanistan meets international standards.

In First, Technical 'C Check' on Airplane Done in Kabul

According to the CEO of Ariana Aviation, the company expects to invest thirty to forty million dollars on four passenger planes.

تصویر بندانگشتی

Afghan engineers have completed a "C check," or deep technical inspection, of an Airbus aircraft at Kabul Airport for the first time.

Abdul Hadi Hamdan, director of Kabul Airport, said that in twenty-eight working days, the plane became certified to fly and the cost of its "C check" has been greatly reduced.

“In the past it used to cost $1.5 million, but now, by our Afghan colleagues and with the coordination and leadership of Ariana Aviation, the cost has dropped to two hundred thousand dollars,” Hamdan said.

Afghanistan has previously sent its huge Airbus planes overseas for technical inspections and C checks. Ariana Aviation Company's CEO, Rahmatullah Agha, said the company's planes are now travelling to Turkey, Qatar, Russia, Pakistan, Iran, and other countries.

According to the CEO of Ariana Aviation, the company expects to invest thirty to forty million dollars on four passenger planes.

Technicians from a domestic aviation company said that the aircraft's "C check" and technical inspection were completed in collaboration with Airbus company.

“We had a very good work team that could perform the “C check” on time,” said Ahmad Seyar, the engineer.

“The 560 task cards which were issued by Airbus have been fully implemented,” said Mohammad Homayoun Stanekzai, director of flight safety.

Afghanistan now has two airlines that fly to and from various countries. The flights of major aviation companies are scheduled to resume at Kabul Airport as aviation in Afghanistan meets international standards.

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