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Businesswomen Run Successful Spaghetti Factory In Balkh

A Balkh woman is making inroads into the local market after opening a spaghetti factory in Dehdadi district of Balkh province. 

In addition the factory provides jobs to 30 other females. 
 
Ruqia Hakimi, the owner of the factory, said she was tried of being unemployed and two years ago, along with five other women, started the factory. 
 
Hakimi said they implemented their business plan and currently employ thirty other women. 
 
“On a daily bases we use 49kg of flour and if the demand is high at the market we even use double that,” Hakimi said. 
 
Hakimi believes that a small investment can improve the financial status of people. 

Hakimi has however called on government to help them with small loans, and she has urged the public to support locally made products.
 
Most of the women in the factory are the breadwinners in their families and said they are happy to have work. 
 
One female employee said that by working at the factory she was able to cover her family’s expenses. 
 
“We must also work, because work is not just for males, females must also work,” said Bilqes, another factory worker. 
 
Zahra, who is 20 years old and is in the 10th grade, has also been working at the factory for a year. She said the money she earns is paying for her schooling. 

“I am going to school and also working in the factory and the salary I get I use for my stationary,” Zahra said. 
 
These women however said if government supports small businesses by giving start up loans and if the public buys their products local businesses, theirs included, will grow. 

Businesswomen Run Successful Spaghetti Factory In Balkh

A Balkh women, who started a factory two years ago with five other women, is providing work for 30 other females. 

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A Balkh woman is making inroads into the local market after opening a spaghetti factory in Dehdadi district of Balkh province. 

In addition the factory provides jobs to 30 other females. 
 
Ruqia Hakimi, the owner of the factory, said she was tried of being unemployed and two years ago, along with five other women, started the factory. 
 
Hakimi said they implemented their business plan and currently employ thirty other women. 
 
“On a daily bases we use 49kg of flour and if the demand is high at the market we even use double that,” Hakimi said. 
 
Hakimi believes that a small investment can improve the financial status of people. 

Hakimi has however called on government to help them with small loans, and she has urged the public to support locally made products.
 
Most of the women in the factory are the breadwinners in their families and said they are happy to have work. 
 
One female employee said that by working at the factory she was able to cover her family’s expenses. 
 
“We must also work, because work is not just for males, females must also work,” said Bilqes, another factory worker. 
 
Zahra, who is 20 years old and is in the 10th grade, has also been working at the factory for a year. She said the money she earns is paying for her schooling. 

“I am going to school and also working in the factory and the salary I get I use for my stationary,” Zahra said. 
 
These women however said if government supports small businesses by giving start up loans and if the public buys their products local businesses, theirs included, will grow. 

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