Latest news
تصویر بندانگشتی

Public Hospitals Face Shortage of Medical Supplies

Afghan health officials said that public hospitals are struggling with the shortage of medical supplies and that the aid provided by international donors is not sufficient to meet the needs of hospitals.  

Dr. Ali Akbar, who has been working at the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital for the past three years, said on Friday that the workload for medical professionals has greatly increased following several doctors leaving their jobs in the past month.

“Our staff has been reduced because employees were not being paid,” he said. “The healthcare at rural clinics in the provinces has been suspended. All the people have come to Kabul, the burden is on us.”   

The people who brought their patients from the provinces complained about the closing of medical centers in the countryside, saying that they are forced to bring their patients to the capital. 

Afghan health officials said the suspension of international aid to Afghanistan is greatly affecting the Afghan health sector.

“Our hope is to focus on patients and provide them with assistance that includes medicine, injections, and expensive drugs that are out of their capacity to buy,” said Sayed Asadullah Sadat, head of the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital.  

“If I was in a good economic condition I would have gone to a private hospital for treatment, but I am not in a good economic condition and therefore I brought (my daughter) here," said Gulrang, a resident of Bamiyan province who brought her daughter to Kabul for medical treatment.

A resident of Logar province, Roya, said “there is a shortage of medicine and a load of patients, there are a lot of problems.” 

This comes as the Washington Post reported that the UNDP would pay the salaries of 25,000 medical employees in the coming weeks.  

Public Hospitals Face Shortage of Medical Supplies

Patients and those accompanying them said they were incapable of paying for expensive medicine.  

تصویر بندانگشتی

Afghan health officials said that public hospitals are struggling with the shortage of medical supplies and that the aid provided by international donors is not sufficient to meet the needs of hospitals.  

Dr. Ali Akbar, who has been working at the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital for the past three years, said on Friday that the workload for medical professionals has greatly increased following several doctors leaving their jobs in the past month.

“Our staff has been reduced because employees were not being paid,” he said. “The healthcare at rural clinics in the provinces has been suspended. All the people have come to Kabul, the burden is on us.”   

The people who brought their patients from the provinces complained about the closing of medical centers in the countryside, saying that they are forced to bring their patients to the capital. 

Afghan health officials said the suspension of international aid to Afghanistan is greatly affecting the Afghan health sector.

“Our hope is to focus on patients and provide them with assistance that includes medicine, injections, and expensive drugs that are out of their capacity to buy,” said Sayed Asadullah Sadat, head of the Indira Gandhi Children's Hospital.  

“If I was in a good economic condition I would have gone to a private hospital for treatment, but I am not in a good economic condition and therefore I brought (my daughter) here," said Gulrang, a resident of Bamiyan province who brought her daughter to Kabul for medical treatment.

A resident of Logar province, Roya, said “there is a shortage of medicine and a load of patients, there are a lot of problems.” 

This comes as the Washington Post reported that the UNDP would pay the salaries of 25,000 medical employees in the coming weeks.  

Share this post

Comment this post