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Journalists Call for Implementation of Access to Information Law

Following the recent violence against journalists, the Afghanistan Independent Journalists Association (AIJA) asked the Taliban to implement the Access to Information law in the country.

Recently the Taliban detained and even beat journalists who were covering various events, including demonstrations by women, in various cities.

The incidents sparked broad reactions.

Hujatullah Mujadidi, AIJA deputy, asked that the law be implemented: “It is a comprehensive law. The law is about responding to questions. A lot of work has been done on the law and it will help the media and journalists get access to information.”

Based on the statistics issued by the AIJA, twenty-four journalists were detained, and of these two were beaten by the Taliban. Abdul Aziz Karimi, a journalist, said: “ They tell us you're are free to work, but if we want to provide a report, we are not allowed.”

University teachers and lawyers spoke of the significance of the Access to Information Law.

University teacher Gulchehra Baheen said: “ The Access to Information Law has many uses, it will make the government respond to the people.”

“Recently we witnessed that some journalists were tortured and beaten. In fact, this is a kind of crime committed by the Taliban,” said Rohullah Sakhizada, a lawyer.

Officials from the Cultural Commission of the Taliban said they will try to prevent such violent incidents in the future and that access to information is the right of everyone and the Taliban will soon hold a session with media officials.

Abdul Haq Emad, a member of the Taliban Cultural Commission, said: “ We hope such violent incidents do not occur again. Freedom of speech is the right of everyone and the work of journalists is valued.”

Journalists Call for Implementation of Access to Information Law

Recently the Taliban detained and even beat journalists who were covering various events, including demonstrations by women, in various cities.

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Following the recent violence against journalists, the Afghanistan Independent Journalists Association (AIJA) asked the Taliban to implement the Access to Information law in the country.

Recently the Taliban detained and even beat journalists who were covering various events, including demonstrations by women, in various cities.

The incidents sparked broad reactions.

Hujatullah Mujadidi, AIJA deputy, asked that the law be implemented: “It is a comprehensive law. The law is about responding to questions. A lot of work has been done on the law and it will help the media and journalists get access to information.”

Based on the statistics issued by the AIJA, twenty-four journalists were detained, and of these two were beaten by the Taliban. Abdul Aziz Karimi, a journalist, said: “ They tell us you're are free to work, but if we want to provide a report, we are not allowed.”

University teachers and lawyers spoke of the significance of the Access to Information Law.

University teacher Gulchehra Baheen said: “ The Access to Information Law has many uses, it will make the government respond to the people.”

“Recently we witnessed that some journalists were tortured and beaten. In fact, this is a kind of crime committed by the Taliban,” said Rohullah Sakhizada, a lawyer.

Officials from the Cultural Commission of the Taliban said they will try to prevent such violent incidents in the future and that access to information is the right of everyone and the Taliban will soon hold a session with media officials.

Abdul Haq Emad, a member of the Taliban Cultural Commission, said: “ We hope such violent incidents do not occur again. Freedom of speech is the right of everyone and the work of journalists is valued.”

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