Latest news
Thumbnail

While the peace process enters a new stage, some soldiers with disabilities and families of fallen troops called on the Afghan government and the international community to provide them the opportunity to be part of the upcoming consultative Loya Jirga on peace and in the structure of the Reconciliation Leadership Council, which has been formed to create a unified stance on peace.  

Jawad Mohammad, who served in the ranks of the Afghan National Army for twelve years, said he lost his two legs and his hand when trying to defuse a roadside mine in northern Kunduz province few years ago.

“Our seat is vacant at the peace table,” he said. “No one is there to represent us, no one is counting on us, no one values the families of the martyrs. We have serious complaint from the Afghan government and the international community. We make a large segment of the society. Why we have been forgotten?” he asked.  

“No assistance has been provided to us. Problems of disabled soldiers and family of the martyrs should be addressed,” said Mohammad Sharif, a disabled member of the Afghan National Police.

Qamar Gul, a widow an Afghan security force member, said government officials and the president have not delivered on their promises about the families of those “martyred” soldiers.

“We call on government to pay attention to us and support families of martyred soldiers. Two and half a year have passed since my son was martyred, but so far, we have not seen any government official to inquire about our problems,” said Qamar Gul.

“Our expectation from government is to consider the same right for us like other citizens,” said Wahida, a widow of a security force member in Kabul.

Members of a foundation knowns as Help For Afghan Heroes said that government has ignored a letter sent from the foundation regarding a share for family members of the Afghan security forces in the peace process.

Although there is no an exact figure about the acutal number of the Afghan security forces killed in the war, but in January President Ashraf Ghani who addressed a panel at the World Economic Forum in Davos disclosed new figures on casualties of Afghan forces by saying that more than 45,000 Afghan security personnel have paid the ultimate sacrifice since he took the office in September 2014.

He put the number at more than 28,000 last year in November.

 

Disabled soldiers said they have been sidelined from the ongoing peace process in the country.

Thumbnail

While the peace process enters a new stage, some soldiers with disabilities and families of fallen troops called on the Afghan government and the international community to provide them the opportunity to be part of the upcoming consultative Loya Jirga on peace and in the structure of the Reconciliation Leadership Council, which has been formed to create a unified stance on peace.  

Jawad Mohammad, who served in the ranks of the Afghan National Army for twelve years, said he lost his two legs and his hand when trying to defuse a roadside mine in northern Kunduz province few years ago.

“Our seat is vacant at the peace table,” he said. “No one is there to represent us, no one is counting on us, no one values the families of the martyrs. We have serious complaint from the Afghan government and the international community. We make a large segment of the society. Why we have been forgotten?” he asked.  

“No assistance has been provided to us. Problems of disabled soldiers and family of the martyrs should be addressed,” said Mohammad Sharif, a disabled member of the Afghan National Police.

Qamar Gul, a widow an Afghan security force member, said government officials and the president have not delivered on their promises about the families of those “martyred” soldiers.

“We call on government to pay attention to us and support families of martyred soldiers. Two and half a year have passed since my son was martyred, but so far, we have not seen any government official to inquire about our problems,” said Qamar Gul.

“Our expectation from government is to consider the same right for us like other citizens,” said Wahida, a widow of a security force member in Kabul.

Members of a foundation knowns as Help For Afghan Heroes said that government has ignored a letter sent from the foundation regarding a share for family members of the Afghan security forces in the peace process.

Although there is no an exact figure about the acutal number of the Afghan security forces killed in the war, but in January President Ashraf Ghani who addressed a panel at the World Economic Forum in Davos disclosed new figures on casualties of Afghan forces by saying that more than 45,000 Afghan security personnel have paid the ultimate sacrifice since he took the office in September 2014.

He put the number at more than 28,000 last year in November.

 

Share this post