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New Book By Afghan Scholars Focuses on Consequences of Elite Migration

A research book titled "Factors and Consequences of Migration in Afghanistan" was unveiled by the Herat Council of Specialists.

This book, prepared by five university professors and researchers, focuses on the causes of elite migration and brain drain from the country.

According to this research, economic challenges, lack of job security, and the closure of schools and universities to girls are the main reasons for the migration of the country's elites.

Mohammad Rafiq Shaheer, head of the Herat Council of Specialists, said: "Losing one of our elites, especially under these conditions, takes a long time to replace. Training a doctor, an engineer, or a university professor, particularly for our underdeveloped and impoverished society, is not easy."

The book offers recommendations to the interim government for preventing the brain drain and elite migration, as well as for facilitating the return of these individuals to the country.

According to this research, in the past nearly three years, several European countries, the United States, and Canada have    become hosts to thousands of Afghan migrants. Most of these migrants include university professors, students, experts, and skilled government employees.

Experts say the migration of elites and brain drain is detrimental to Afghanistan.

Abdul Rahman Karimi, a university professor and researcher, said: "Countries have seized the opportunity, attracting our elites, which has greatly benefited them."

The research suggests that reopening schools and universities to girls, ensuring job security, and addressing economic challenges in the country can create the conditions for the return of elites to Afghanistan.

Razeya Tabib Zada, one of the book's researchers, said: "Solving the community's economic problems can be seen as a reasonable strategy for the return of migrants to the country, as well as creating job opportunities for the youth."

In the past nearly three years, some countries have opened their borders to Afghan elites.

According to the book's researchers, elite migration and brain drain are detrimental to the country, making Afghanistan dependent on the specialists and elites of neighboring countries.

New Book By Afghan Scholars Focuses on Consequences of Elite Migration

This book, prepared by five university professors and researchers, focuses on the causes of elite migration and brain drain from the country.

تصویر بندانگشتی

A research book titled "Factors and Consequences of Migration in Afghanistan" was unveiled by the Herat Council of Specialists.

This book, prepared by five university professors and researchers, focuses on the causes of elite migration and brain drain from the country.

According to this research, economic challenges, lack of job security, and the closure of schools and universities to girls are the main reasons for the migration of the country's elites.

Mohammad Rafiq Shaheer, head of the Herat Council of Specialists, said: "Losing one of our elites, especially under these conditions, takes a long time to replace. Training a doctor, an engineer, or a university professor, particularly for our underdeveloped and impoverished society, is not easy."

The book offers recommendations to the interim government for preventing the brain drain and elite migration, as well as for facilitating the return of these individuals to the country.

According to this research, in the past nearly three years, several European countries, the United States, and Canada have    become hosts to thousands of Afghan migrants. Most of these migrants include university professors, students, experts, and skilled government employees.

Experts say the migration of elites and brain drain is detrimental to Afghanistan.

Abdul Rahman Karimi, a university professor and researcher, said: "Countries have seized the opportunity, attracting our elites, which has greatly benefited them."

The research suggests that reopening schools and universities to girls, ensuring job security, and addressing economic challenges in the country can create the conditions for the return of elites to Afghanistan.

Razeya Tabib Zada, one of the book's researchers, said: "Solving the community's economic problems can be seen as a reasonable strategy for the return of migrants to the country, as well as creating job opportunities for the youth."

In the past nearly three years, some countries have opened their borders to Afghan elites.

According to the book's researchers, elite migration and brain drain are detrimental to the country, making Afghanistan dependent on the specialists and elites of neighboring countries.

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