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Pakistan Stops Afghan Produce Imports If No EIF Form

As the regional fruit and vegetable season begins, the Central Bank of Pakistan has ordered its customs not to allow Afghan imports without an Electronic Import Form (EIF) form from April 30.

According to a letter, Afghan exports to Pakistan will not be allowed through Pakistani customs without a bank license.

The Chamber of Commerce and Investments (ACCI) warned that if the "EIF" form policy is implemented, the process of transferring the country's exports to Pakistan will be stopped.

“If this issue is not dealt with, our trade with Pakistan will be completely stopped, this issue is worrying and we want the Islamic Emirate to talk to Pakistan ..." said Khanjan Alokozai, a member of the board of directors of ACCI.

Meanwhile, the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL) said they think that Pakistan is not the only market for the country's exports, and that the Islamic Emirate has held talks with all neighboring countries to transport Afghan products.

“We have also talked to our neighbors about transit and they have promised it to us, but it is not clear whether they will fulfill their commitments when we harvest,” said Mesbahuddin Mustaeen, a spokesman for MAIL.

The Afghanistan-Pakistan Joint Chamber of Commerce said Pakistan has twice created exemptions from the requirement for the country's exports, with Saturday being the deadline.

“Formally transferring money requires an electronic form that the central bank of Pakistan gives to Afghanistan's exporters, otherwise there will be no transfer,” said Naqibullah Safi, CEO of the Afghanistan-Pakistan Joint Chamber of Commerce.

In the meantime, an economist is urging traders to look for alternative ways to export goods, because of problems with Pakistan.

“Central Asia is a good option for the country's businessmen and its problems are much less than in Pakistan,” said Mir Shekaib, an economist.

Statistics from the Chamber of Commerce and Investment (ACCI) show that Afghanistan annually exports more than one and a half million tons of talc and coal to Pakistan, and much of Afghanistan's fruit and vegetables are sold in the country's markets.

Pakistan Stops Afghan Produce Imports If No EIF Form

According to a letter, Afghan exports to Pakistan will not be allowed through Pakistani customs without a bank license.

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As the regional fruit and vegetable season begins, the Central Bank of Pakistan has ordered its customs not to allow Afghan imports without an Electronic Import Form (EIF) form from April 30.

According to a letter, Afghan exports to Pakistan will not be allowed through Pakistani customs without a bank license.

The Chamber of Commerce and Investments (ACCI) warned that if the "EIF" form policy is implemented, the process of transferring the country's exports to Pakistan will be stopped.

“If this issue is not dealt with, our trade with Pakistan will be completely stopped, this issue is worrying and we want the Islamic Emirate to talk to Pakistan ..." said Khanjan Alokozai, a member of the board of directors of ACCI.

Meanwhile, the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock (MAIL) said they think that Pakistan is not the only market for the country's exports, and that the Islamic Emirate has held talks with all neighboring countries to transport Afghan products.

“We have also talked to our neighbors about transit and they have promised it to us, but it is not clear whether they will fulfill their commitments when we harvest,” said Mesbahuddin Mustaeen, a spokesman for MAIL.

The Afghanistan-Pakistan Joint Chamber of Commerce said Pakistan has twice created exemptions from the requirement for the country's exports, with Saturday being the deadline.

“Formally transferring money requires an electronic form that the central bank of Pakistan gives to Afghanistan's exporters, otherwise there will be no transfer,” said Naqibullah Safi, CEO of the Afghanistan-Pakistan Joint Chamber of Commerce.

In the meantime, an economist is urging traders to look for alternative ways to export goods, because of problems with Pakistan.

“Central Asia is a good option for the country's businessmen and its problems are much less than in Pakistan,” said Mir Shekaib, an economist.

Statistics from the Chamber of Commerce and Investment (ACCI) show that Afghanistan annually exports more than one and a half million tons of talc and coal to Pakistan, and much of Afghanistan's fruit and vegetables are sold in the country's markets.

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