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Nation Calls for Continued Ceasefire, Violence Down 80 Percent

The three-day ceasefire observed by both the Afghan government and the Taliban in honor of Eid-ul-Fitr ended at midnight on Tuesday; however, neither the government in Kabul nor the Taliban have announced an end to the ceasefire or an extension. 

But a government source on condition of anonymity said that an unofficial ceasefire will continue in the country.

The three-day Eid ceasefire has raised hopes among the embattled Afghans that this time the country will experience long-term peace if the two sides announce an end to hostilities and sit at the peace table.

The Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) reported that during the three-day ceasefire there was an 80 percent decrease in civilian casualties.

“The Independent Human Rights Commission calls on all warring factions to respect the demand of the people and agree on a ceasefire,” said Zabiullah Farhang, the head of the media department of the human rights commission.

Afghans across the country are also pushing for the two sides to extend the ceasefire and start the intra-Afghan talks as soon as possible.

“The Taliban described the release of their 900 prisoners as a positive step--they are very happy--because the Taliban have continued the ceasefire,” said General Wahab Wardak, a military analyst in Kabul.

But minor incidents of mortar attacks and mine explosions we're reported in Helmand, Kandahar, Balkh and Ghazni.

“The two sides should extend the ceasefire---they must come together and move the peace process forward through talks and debate,” said a resident in Kabul Rohul Amin.

According to the AIHRC, before the ceasefire, up to 30 Afghans were killed and wounded as a result of war and violence in the country on a daily basis.

Previously the Afghan government said that it was ready to extend the ceasefire if the Taliban was willing to do so.

Nation Calls for Continued Ceasefire, Violence Down 80 Percent

A government source on condition of anonymity said that an unofficial ceasefire will continue in the country.

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The three-day ceasefire observed by both the Afghan government and the Taliban in honor of Eid-ul-Fitr ended at midnight on Tuesday; however, neither the government in Kabul nor the Taliban have announced an end to the ceasefire or an extension. 

But a government source on condition of anonymity said that an unofficial ceasefire will continue in the country.

The three-day Eid ceasefire has raised hopes among the embattled Afghans that this time the country will experience long-term peace if the two sides announce an end to hostilities and sit at the peace table.

The Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) reported that during the three-day ceasefire there was an 80 percent decrease in civilian casualties.

“The Independent Human Rights Commission calls on all warring factions to respect the demand of the people and agree on a ceasefire,” said Zabiullah Farhang, the head of the media department of the human rights commission.

Afghans across the country are also pushing for the two sides to extend the ceasefire and start the intra-Afghan talks as soon as possible.

“The Taliban described the release of their 900 prisoners as a positive step--they are very happy--because the Taliban have continued the ceasefire,” said General Wahab Wardak, a military analyst in Kabul.

But minor incidents of mortar attacks and mine explosions we're reported in Helmand, Kandahar, Balkh and Ghazni.

“The two sides should extend the ceasefire---they must come together and move the peace process forward through talks and debate,” said a resident in Kabul Rohul Amin.

According to the AIHRC, before the ceasefire, up to 30 Afghans were killed and wounded as a result of war and violence in the country on a daily basis.

Previously the Afghan government said that it was ready to extend the ceasefire if the Taliban was willing to do so.

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