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Kabul Women at Protest Demand Schooling, Govt Inclusion

Women's rights and civil society activists on Sunday gathered in front of the former women's affairs ministry building to react against education restrictions against women and girls and to demand that their intetests are represented in the government.

The caretaker cabinet recently replaced the ministry of women's affairs with the ministry of virtue and vice, and told formerly employed women to stay at home.

The protestors called for the caretaker government to reinstitute the ministry of women and to allow the girls’ secondary schools to be opened.

Lida, a civil society activist, said: “The ministry of women, which is the identity of women, should not be eliminated. This elimination means the removal of women from society.”

Women's rights activist Diba Farahmand said: “The ministry of virtue and vice should not have replaced the ministry of women. It should go elsewhere.”

In the meantime, the protestors emphasized that the women who have been prohibited from working are financially responsible for their families. “There are women who are breadwinners for their families. There is no way for them, except working," said Hasina Sarwari, a women's rights activist.

Meanwhile, a movement called "Wave of Change" led by Fawzia Koofi held a meeting on Sunday, and called for the inclusion of women in the caretaker government, otherwise the movement will launch civil protests.

Fawzia Koofi, who attended the meeting virtually, said that she is coming to Afghanistan soon. She said: “It is apparent that the Taliban sideline women from society. It is clear that the Taliban still hold their previous ideas and have not changed.”

This comes as the education ministry of the caretaker cabinet on Friday announced only that male students and teachers should report to school.

Kabul Women at Protest Demand Schooling, Govt Inclusion

The protestors called for the caretaker government to reinstitute the ministry of women and to allow the girls’ secondary schools to be opened.

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Women's rights and civil society activists on Sunday gathered in front of the former women's affairs ministry building to react against education restrictions against women and girls and to demand that their intetests are represented in the government.

The caretaker cabinet recently replaced the ministry of women's affairs with the ministry of virtue and vice, and told formerly employed women to stay at home.

The protestors called for the caretaker government to reinstitute the ministry of women and to allow the girls’ secondary schools to be opened.

Lida, a civil society activist, said: “The ministry of women, which is the identity of women, should not be eliminated. This elimination means the removal of women from society.”

Women's rights activist Diba Farahmand said: “The ministry of virtue and vice should not have replaced the ministry of women. It should go elsewhere.”

In the meantime, the protestors emphasized that the women who have been prohibited from working are financially responsible for their families. “There are women who are breadwinners for their families. There is no way for them, except working," said Hasina Sarwari, a women's rights activist.

Meanwhile, a movement called "Wave of Change" led by Fawzia Koofi held a meeting on Sunday, and called for the inclusion of women in the caretaker government, otherwise the movement will launch civil protests.

Fawzia Koofi, who attended the meeting virtually, said that she is coming to Afghanistan soon. She said: “It is apparent that the Taliban sideline women from society. It is clear that the Taliban still hold their previous ideas and have not changed.”

This comes as the education ministry of the caretaker cabinet on Friday announced only that male students and teachers should report to school.

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