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Afghan Girls Face Uncertain Future Amid Closed Schools

Many Afghan girls are deeply concerned over whether or not the Taliban will allow girls and young women to return to secondary schools.

The Ministry of Information and Culture said the caretaker government in cooperation with some religious scholars is working on a plan to open schools for girls.

“The plan will not take a long time, it will be finalized soon. Twenty years ago was different from now. We had economic problems. The country was destroyed and we needed to rebuild it," said Zabihullah Mujahid, deputy minister of culture and information.

Binazir Haqjo, a student in eleventh grade, hopes the government will allow girls to continue education.

Binazir Haqjo said: “I have not left my home since the government changed. I think all our efforts in the field of learning are being wasted. We had gone to school despite economic and security challenges. Now, we are wasting all this."

Samira, a student said: “ I want to study and I wish to become a judge. If the Taliban keep closing my school, how can I become a judge?”

At the same time, a number of schoolteachers fear that the Taliban’s plan may take years, and girls will remain out of school in the meantime.

“In fact, they (Taliban) don’t want women to study and become literate. They want to take Afghanistan twenty years back,” said Shamsia, a teacher.

“The ideas have not changed. As a woman, I don’t believe in their promises. During the first reign, they promised this and never did it, said Suhaila Sadat, a women’s rights activist.

Afghan Girls Face Uncertain Future Amid Closed Schools

Many Afghan girls are deeply concerned over whether or not the Taliban will allow girls and young women to return to secondary schools.

تصویر بندانگشتی

Many Afghan girls are deeply concerned over whether or not the Taliban will allow girls and young women to return to secondary schools.

The Ministry of Information and Culture said the caretaker government in cooperation with some religious scholars is working on a plan to open schools for girls.

“The plan will not take a long time, it will be finalized soon. Twenty years ago was different from now. We had economic problems. The country was destroyed and we needed to rebuild it," said Zabihullah Mujahid, deputy minister of culture and information.

Binazir Haqjo, a student in eleventh grade, hopes the government will allow girls to continue education.

Binazir Haqjo said: “I have not left my home since the government changed. I think all our efforts in the field of learning are being wasted. We had gone to school despite economic and security challenges. Now, we are wasting all this."

Samira, a student said: “ I want to study and I wish to become a judge. If the Taliban keep closing my school, how can I become a judge?”

At the same time, a number of schoolteachers fear that the Taliban’s plan may take years, and girls will remain out of school in the meantime.

“In fact, they (Taliban) don’t want women to study and become literate. They want to take Afghanistan twenty years back,” said Shamsia, a teacher.

“The ideas have not changed. As a woman, I don’t believe in their promises. During the first reign, they promised this and never did it, said Suhaila Sadat, a women’s rights activist.

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